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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Biology, Epidemiology and Management of Vector-Borne Viruses of Sugarbeet and Vegetable Crops

Location: Crop Improvement and Protection Research

Title: Tomato chlorosis virus and Tomato infectious chlorosis virus

Author
item Wintermantel, William

Submitted to: Plant Management Network
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: April 17, 2013
Publication Date: June 10, 2013
Citation: Wintermantel, W.M. 2013. Tomato chlorosis virus and Tomato infectious chlorosis virus. Plant Management Network. Available: http://www.plantmanagementnetwork.org/edcenter/seminars/Tomato/ChlorosisVirus.

Interpretive Summary: This presentation will help consultants, growers, and other practitioners in the Southern and Western Regions of the US, as well as Mexico and the Caribbean identify and manage Tomato infectious chlorosis virus (TICV) and Tomato chlorosis virus (ToCV) in tomato. Information will directly benefit crop consultants, growers, and other practitioners responsible for fresh market tomato production under both field and greenhouse conditions. The presentation addresses virus symptoms, distribution, transmission by whitefly vectors, approaches for virus identification and differentiating viruses from one another, as well as specific issues affecting management. By the end of the presentation the practitioner should know more about how to identify potentially infected plants, alternative host plants that may support infection and become sources for transmission, and whitefly vectors responsible for transmission. This information should allow the practitioner to improve management and limit infection.

Technical Abstract: This presentation will help consultants, growers, and other practitioners in the Southern and Western Regions of the US, as well as Mexico and the Caribbean identify and manage Tomato infectious chlorosis virus (TICV) and Tomato chlorosis virus (ToCV) in tomato. Information will directly benefit crop consultants, growers, and other practitioners responsible for fresh market tomato production under both field and greenhouse conditions. The presentation addresses virus symptoms, distribution, transmission by whitefly vectors, approaches for virus identification and differentiating viruses from one another, as well as specific issues affecting management. By the end of the presentation the practitioner should know more about how to identify potentially infected plants, alternative host plants that may support infection and become sources for transmission, and whitefly vectors responsible for transmission. This information should allow the practitioner to improve management and limit infection.

Last Modified: 10/23/2014
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