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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGY AND BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF ROOT DISEASES OF WHEAT, BARLEY AND BIOFUEL BRASSICAS

Location: Root Disease and Biological Control Research

Title: Taxonomy and distribution of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid-producing Pseudomonas spp. in the dryland agroecosystem of the Inland Pacific Northwest

Authors
item Parejko, J. -
item Mavrodi, D. -
item Mavrodi, O. -
item WELLER, DAVID
item THOMASHOW, LINDA

Submitted to: Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 12, 2013
Publication Date: July 20, 2013
Citation: Parejko, J.A., Mavrodi, D.M., Mavrodi, O.V., Weller, D.M., Thomashow, L.S. 2013. Taxonomy and distribution of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid-producing Pseudomonas spp. in the dryland agroecosystem of the Inland Pacific Northwest. Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 79(12):3887-3891.

Interpretive Summary: The low-precipitation zone of the Inland Pacific Northwest is the largest contiguous cropping system in the western United States. Roots of wheat grown in this region are heavily colonized by Pseudomonas beneficial bacteria that produce natural phenazine antibiotics. Phenazines are produced on the roots and provide natural protection against soil-borne fungal pathogens and may help to mobilize iron for the plant. This study focused on understanding the identity and distribution of the different types of phenazine-producing Pseudomonas bacteria associated with wheat. This research is important because it will help wheat farmers make better use of the Pseudomonas bacteria that can naturally protect their crop against root diseases.

Technical Abstract: Five distinct phenazine-producing Pseudomonas species were found, two of which were provisionally ascribed as new species. Agroclimatic zone and the soil silt content were found to affect the distribution of the different species. This study clarifies the classification of these important plant beneficial microorganisms in an expansive dryland agroecosystem.

Last Modified: 8/19/2014
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