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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Understanding and Mitigating the Adverse Effects of Poisonous Plants on Livestock Production Systems

Location: Poisonous Plant Research

Title: The alkaloid profiles of Sophora nuttalliana and Sophora stenophylla

Authors
item Lee, Stephen
item Cook, Daniel
item Molyneux, Russell -
item Marcolongo-Pereira, Clairton -
item Stonecipher, Clinton
item Gardner, Dale

Submitted to: Biochemical Systematics and Ecology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 24, 2012
Publication Date: June 1, 2013
Citation: Lee, S.T., Cook, D., Molyneux, R.J., Marcolongo-Pereira, C., Stonecipher, C.A., Gardner, D.R. 2013. The alkaloid profiles of Sophora nuttalliana and Sophora stenophylla. Biochemical Systematics and Ecology. 48: 58-64.

Interpretive Summary: Sophora is a diverse genus of plants comprised of herbs, shrubs, and trees that occurs throughout the world, primarily in the northern hemisphere. Different species of Sophora are known to contain alkaloids that are toxic and can cause birth defects. Two herbaceous species occur in North America, Sophora stenophylla and S. nuttalliana. The alkaloid composition of these two species was investigated throughout their geographical distribution using field collections and herbarium specimens. Both species contain alkaloids, and S. nuttalliana contains the alkaloid anagyrine which can cause birth defects. Lastly, neither species contains the neurotoxin swainsonine as implied by the common name “white loco” for S. nuttalliana.

Technical Abstract: Sophora is a diverse genus in the family Fabaceae, comprised of herbs, shrubs, and trees that occurs throughout the world, primarily in the northern hemisphere. Species of Sophora are known to contain quinolizidine alkaloids that are toxic and potentially teratogenic. Two perennial herbaceous species occur in North America, Sophora stenophylla and S. nuttalliana. The quinolizidine alkaloid composition of these two species was investigated throughout their geographical distribution using field collections and herbarium specimens. Both species contain quinolizidine alkaloids, and S. nuttalliana contains the teratogen anagyrine. Lastly, neither species contains the neurotoxin swainsonine as implied by the common name “white loco” for S. nuttalliana.

Last Modified: 12/18/2014
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