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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVEMENT OF PEST RESISTANCE AND QUALITY TRAITS OF SOYBEAN

Location: Corn, Soybean and Wheat Quality Research Unit

Title: Developing host-plant resistance for hemipteran soybean pests: lessons from soybean aphid and stink bugs

Authors
item Bansal, Raman -
item Jun, Tai-Hwan -
item Mian, Rouf
item Michel, Andrew -

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: October 12, 2012
Publication Date: February 13, 2013
Citation: Bansal, R., Jun, T., Mian, R.M., Michel, A.P. 2013. Developing host-plant resistance for hemipteran soybean pests: lessons from soybean aphid and stink bugs. In Tech. DOI:10.5772/54597.

Interpretive Summary: United States is the leading soybean producer with 33% of world’s total production in 2010. However, the soybean crop has been challenged by various biotic stresses, e.g. diseases, insect-pests, weeds, etc. and abiotic stresses, e.g. drought, flooding, nutrient deficiency, etc. With increasing intensity of soybean production in the US and worldwide, there is increasing threats of insect-pests attacking this crop. Traditionally, soybean has been attacked by foliage-feeding Lepidopteran and Coleopteran pests such as bean leaf beetle, stem borer, leaf miner, soybean looper, velvet bean caterpillar, beet armyworm, Mexican bean beetle, etc. However, during the last decade, invasion of soybean aphid, brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB), redbanded stink bug, and kudzu bug as major pests in US has completely changed the pest population scenario in the soybean crop. The threats posed by soybean aphid and stink bugs have been significant as these insects continue to expand their geographical range, for example, soybean aphid has spread across 30 states in US by 2009 and BMSB has already been detected in central and southern US. During these years, both soybean aphid and stink bug complex have caused considerable damage to the soybean crop. Both soybean aphid and stink bug belong to order Hemiptera (sucking insects) which also includes other economic pests such as whitefly, plant hoppers, etc. To minimize the damage by Hemipteran pests, inherent resistance in some soybean can be used as an important part of the integrated pest management (IPM) programs. In the current chapter, we reviewed the recent research advances on soybean resistance to Hemipteran pests. In the light of challenges to manage Hemipteran pests, we have proposed strategies for successful and sustainable use of host plant resistance in soybean against these pests.

Technical Abstract: Soybean is one of the world’s leading agricultural crops with multiple uses, including human food, animal feed, edible oil, biofuel, industrial products, cosmetics, etc. In soybean production, United States is the leading country with 33% of world’s total production of 251.5 million Metric tons. However, the soybean crop has been challenged by various biotic factors e.g. diseases, insect-pests, weeds, etc. as well as abiotic factors e.g. drought, flooding, nutrient deficiency, etc. In North-America, ever since the exponential increase of acreage under soybean production during the second half of last century, there is continuous threats of insect-pests attacking this crop. Traditionally, soybean has been attacked by foliage-feeding Lepidopteran and Coleopteran pests such as bean leaf beetle, stem borer, leaf miner, soybean looper, velvet bean caterpillar, beet armyworm, Mexican bean beetle, etc. However, during the last decade, invasion of soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura, brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB), Halyomorpha halys (Stål), redbanded stink bug, Piezodorus guildinii (Westwood), and kudzu bug, Megacopta cribraria (F.), as major pests in US has completely changed the pest population scenario in the soybean crop. Further, the threat posed by soybean aphid and stink bugs has been aggravating as these insects continue to expand their geographical range, for example, soybean aphid has spread across 30 states in US by 2009 and BMSB has already been detected in central and southern US. During these years, both soybean aphid and stink bug complex have caused considerable damage to the soybean crop. Both soybean aphid and stink bug belong to order Hemiptera which also includes other economic pests such as whitefly, plant hoppers, etc. To minimize the damage by Hemipteran pests, inherent resistance in soybean cultivars constitute an integral part of the integrated pest management (IPM) programs. In the current chapter, we reviewed the recent research advances on soybean resistance to Hemipteran pests. In the light of various challenges to manage Hemipteran pests, we have proposed strategies for successful and sustainable use of host plant resistance in soybean against these pests.

Last Modified: 9/2/2014
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