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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Value-Added Products from Cottonseed

Location: Commodity Utilization Research

Title: Effects of vigorous blending on yield and quality of protein isolates extracted from cottonseed and soy flours

Authors
item He, Zhongqi
item Cao, Heping
item Cheng, Huai
item Zou, Haixuan -
item Hunt, James

Submitted to: Modern Applied Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 16, 2013
Publication Date: September 27, 2013
Citation: He, Z., Cao, H., Cheng, H.N., Zou, H., Hunt, J.F. 2013. Effects of vigorous blending on yield and quality of protein isolates extracted from cottonseed and soy flours. Modern Applied Science. 7(10):79-88.

Interpretive Summary: To improve the recovery of the protein from cottonseed flour, we tested the effects of vigorous blending on the extraction efficiency and recovery yield of one- and two-step procedures of cottonseed protein isolation. Our data indicated that vigorous blending could improve the protein recovery from cottonseed and soy flour as high as 40-60%, compared to that with mild agitation in the extraction phase, whereas the quality of these protein isolates was not changed. Futhermore, we found the simialrity of the secondary structures of cottonseed and soy protein isolates, implying that these two types of proteins may have similar adhesive properties. In other words, the widely-available knowledge and know-how on soy protein adhesives could be applicable to cottonseed-based products, thus benefiting and facilitating the development of cottonseed-based wood adhesives.

Technical Abstract: Cottonseed protein has shown great potential as a biodegradable and renewable resource for industrial processes such as the manufacture of wood adhesives. To improve the recovery of the protein from cottonseed flour, we tested the effects of vigorous blending on the extraction efficiency and recovery yield of one- and two-step procedures of cottonseed protein isolation. For comparison, the effects on one-step soy protein isolation were also examined. Our data indicated that vigorous blending could improve the protein recovery from cottonseed and soy flour as much as 40-60%, compared to mild agitation in the extraction phase. The improvement was likely due to the enhanced solid (flour)-liquid (extracting solvent) interaction, and the increased extraction temperature of the vigorous blending process. Similarities in the protein content, molecular mass distribution pattern, and secondary structure of each type of protein isolates under different blending treatments indicated that quality of the isolates was not altered by vigorous blending. However, dissimilarities in molecular mass distribution patterns and secondary structures were identified between the different types of isolates (i. e. total, water soluble, and alkali soluble cottonseed proteins, and total soy protein). These differences will enable us to explore in future work the correlations between cottonseed protein structures and industrial use characteristics (such as adhesive properties).

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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