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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SYSTEMATICS OF HEMIPTERA AND RELATED GROUPS: PLANT PESTS, PREDATORS, AND DISEASE VECTORS

Location: Systematic Entomology

Title: Carvalhoisca, a new genus and two new species of Ceratocapsini (Heteroptera: Miridae: Orthotylinae) from Argentina and Brazil

Author
item Henry, Thomas

Submitted to: Revista Societas Entomologia Argentina
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 30, 2013
Publication Date: December 25, 2013
Citation: Henry, T.J. 2013. Carvalhoisca, a new genus and two new species of Ceratocapsini (Heteroptera: Miridae: Orthotylinae) from Argentina and Brazil. Revista Societas Entomologia Argentina. 72(3-4):147-153.

Interpretive Summary: Plant bugs represent the largest family of true bugs and include numerous agriculturally important species. Many are serious crop pests, causing enormous economic losses in the United States and the world annually. A large number of these bugs, however, are beneficial and prey on various arthropod pests, such as aphids, scale insects, mites, and caterpillars, making them of considerable interest to researchers involved in biological control. This paper provides the description of a new genus and two new species of plant bugs from South America. Although the hosts and habits are unknown, their relationship with other members of this group suggests that they are predatory. Color photographs of the male and female, illustrations of male genitalia, and diagnostic characters are provided to help distinguish these new plant bugs from related members of the group. Information on these insects will be of interest to a wide range of researchers, regulatory personnel, and Federal and state departments of agriculture working in insect pest management and biological control.

Technical Abstract: The ceratocapsine plant bug genus Carvalhoisca (Miridae: Orthotylinae) is described to accommodate the new species C. carpinteroi from Correntes, Argentina, and C. costai from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Diagnoses, illustrations of male genitalia, photographs of the male and female of both species, and selected scanning electron photomicrographs are provided to help distinguish this new genus and two new species from other members of the tribe Ceratocapsini.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014
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