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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: METABOLOMIC AND MICROBIAL PROFILING OF TROPICAL/SUBTROPICAL FRUITS AND SMALL FRUITS FOR QUALITY FACTORS AND MICROBIAL STABILITY

Location: Citrus and Other Subtropical Products Research

Title: Effect of blending Huanglongbing (HLB) disease affected orange juice with juice from healthy oranges on flavor quality

Authors
item Raithore, Smita
item Dea, Sharon
item Plotto, Anne
item Bai, Jinhe
item Manthey, John
item Narciso, Jan
item Irey, Mike -
item Baldwin, Elizabeth

Submitted to: LWT - Food Science and Technology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 9, 2014
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Orange juice is the most popular fruit juice in the United States because of its flavor and more notably for nutritional benefits. Huanglongbing (HLB), or citrus greening disease, has been a concern for the citrus industry as it progressively damages and ultimately kills citrus trees. While this disease does not affect human health, it is associated with bitter off-flavor for orange juice. Considering the serious threat that HLB disease is posing to the Florida citrus industry, it is of utmost interest to evaluate whether HLB symptomatic (HLBs) juices can be blended with high quality (healthy) juice to maintain commercial acceptability. It is, therefore, the purpose of this study to determine the levels of HLBs juice that can be added to a healthy juice without introducing off-flavor.

Technical Abstract: Huanglongbing, or citrus greening disease, has been a concern for the citrus industry as it progressively damages and ultimately kills citrus trees. While this disease does not affect human health, it is associated with bitter off-flavor for orange juice. The objective of this study was to determine the level of HLB-symptomatic juice (HLBs, made from fruit symptomatic for the disease) that can be added to healthy juice (extracted from fruit harvested from healthy trees) so that the off-flavor associated with such juice is not perceived. For this, we blended 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50 and 100 g 100 mL-1 HLBs Hamlin or Valencia orange juices with respective healthy juices. Chemical and sensorial differences were found for both varieties. HLBs juice had lower soluble solids but higher acidity, limonin and nomilin levels than did healthy. However, only about 26% of the 22 panelists were able to recognize taste differences in 25 g 100 mL-1 HLBs juice and less than 4% could recognize taste differences with 6.25 and 12.5 g 100 mL-1 HLBs juices. Electronic tongue differentiation of blends supported the chemical and sensory differences. Results showed that adding small amounts of HLBs juice to healthy juice does not compromise taste quality.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014
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