Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Using Agricultural and Industrial Byproducts to Improve Crop Production Systems and Environment Quality

Location: National Soil Dynamics Laboratory

Title: Impact of alternative n fertilizer sources on cotton yield and greenhouse gas emissions in a coastal plain soil

Authors
item Watts, Dexter
item Torbert, Henry

Submitted to: ASA-CSSA-SSSA Annual Meeting Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: October 21, 2012
Publication Date: October 21, 2012
Citation: Watts, D.B., Torbert III, H.A. 2012. Impact of alternative n fertilizer sources on cotton yield and greenhouse gas emissions in a coastal plain soil. ASA-CSSA-SSSA Annual Meeting Abstracts. CDROM.

Technical Abstract: Interest in the use of alternative fertilizer sources have increased in recent years. This is partially attributed to the belief that the new enhanced-efficiency N fertilizer sources can potentially increase crop yield, while at the same time decreasing greenhouse gas emissions. Thus, a field study was conducted on a Coastal Plain soil (Marvyn loamy sand; fine-loamy, kaolinitic, thermic Typic Kanhapludult) in Central Alabama from 2009 to 2011 to compare enhance-efficiency N fertilizers to traditional N sources in a high-residue conservation cotton production system. Nitrogen fertilizer sources evaluated included urea, SuperU, poultry litter, poultry litter + Agrotain Plus, polymer coated urea (ESN), urea-ammonia sulfate, and ammonia sulfate. The greatest greenhouse gas emission losses from soil generally occurred following the first two or three days after fertilization. The use of the enhance efficiency fertilizers showed potential for reducing greenhouse emissions compared to some of the traditional fertilizer sources. However, only minor yield differences were observed between the different N sources.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page