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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Intervention Strategies to Control and Prevent Disease Outbreaks Caused by Avian Influenza and Other Emerging Poultry Pathogens

Location: Exotic and Emerging Avian Viral Diseases Research Unit

Title: Influenza subtype identification with molecular methods

Author
item Spackman, Erica

Submitted to: Animal Influenza Virus
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: February 3, 2014
Publication Date: June 11, 2014
Citation: Spackman, E. 2014. Influenza subtype identification with molecular methods. In: Spackman, E., editor. Animal Influenza Virus: Methods in Molecular Biology. Volume 1161. p. 119-123.

Interpretive Summary: Gene sequencing and RT-PCR based methods are the molecular alternative to serology for the identification of influenza virus hemagglutinin and neuraminidase antigenic subtypes. Compared to serology both RT-PCR and sequencing are preferred subtyping methods because of the number of reference reagents which need to be prepared for serological methods and results of molecular methods are often easier to interpret. The best method to utilize will depend on the goals of the work being conducted and the resources available. The salient features and basic out-line of work flow for subtype identification by molecular methods will be discussed.

Technical Abstract: Gene sequencing and RT-PCR based methods are the molecular alternative to serology for the identification of influenza virus hemagglutinin and neuraminidase antigenic subtypes. Compared to serology both RT-PCR and sequencing are preferred subtyping methods because of the number of reference reagents which need to be prepared for serological methods and results of molecular methods are often easier to interpret. The best method to utilize will depend on the goals of the work being conducted and the resources available. The salient features and basic out-line of work flow for subtype identification by molecular methods will be discussed.

Last Modified: 8/1/2014
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