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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INTEGRATED APPROACH TO THE DETECTION AND CONTROL OF FOODBORNE PARASITES AND THE IMPACT ON FOOD SAFETY

Location: Animal Parasitic Diseases

Title: Comments on "Detection of Toxoplasma gondii in raw caprine, ovine, bovine, and camel milk using cell cultivation, cat bioassay, capture ELISA, and PCR methods in Iran.

Authors
item Dubey, Jitender
item Jones, Jeffery -

Submitted to: Foodborne Pathogens and Disease
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 22, 2014
Publication Date: June 2, 2014
Citation: Dubey, J.P., Jones, J.L. 2014. Comments on "Detection of Toxoplasma gondii in raw caprine, ovine, bovine, and camel milk using cell cultivation, cat bioassay, capture ELISA, and PCR methods in Iran". Foodborne Pathogens and Disease. 11(6):500-501.

Interpretive Summary: Toxoplasmosis is a parasitic infection of humans and animals and it continues to be public health and food safety issue. Among the many ways this infection is acquired, the consumption of unpasteurized goat cheese and milk has been suggested as a risk factor for toxoplasmosis in humans. Although pasteurization of milk is mandatory in many US states, many Americans consume products labeled as “Only for pet consumption” or as participants in food cooperatives. A recent study from Iran (Dehkordi et al., Foodborne Pathogens and Disease 10: 120-125, 2013) reported that Toxoplasma was excreted in milk of several naturally infected species, including goats. These results are at variance of previous reports that Toxoplasma is rarely found in milk. In the present communication scientists at ARS and the CDC discuss the shortcomings of the Iranian report, so that the public may be better informed of the facts. These results will be useful for parasitologists, physicians and veterinarians.

Technical Abstract: Toxoplasmosis is a parasitic infection of humans and animals and it continues to be public health and food safety issue. Among the many ways this infection is acquired, the consumption of unpasteurized goat cheese and milk has been suggested as a risk factor for toxoplasmosis in humans. Although pasteurization of milk is mandatory in many Us states many Americans consume products labeled as“Only for pet consumption” or as participants in food cooperatives. A recent study from Iran (Dehkordi et al., Foodborne Pathogens and Disease 10: 120-125, 2013) reported that Toxoplasma was excreted in milk of several naturally infected species, including goats. These results are at variance of previous reports that Toxoplasma is rarely found in milk. In the present communication scientists at ARS, in collaboration with CDC discuss the shortcomings of the Iranian report so that public is informed of facts. These results will be useful for parasitologists, physicians and veterinarians.

Last Modified: 12/19/2014
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