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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: A Nonradioactive Colony Lift-Hybridization Assay for Detection of B. Bronchiseptica Infection in Swine

Authors
item Register, Karen
item Ackermann, Mark
item Dyer, David - UNIV OF OK, OKLAHOMA CITY

Submitted to: Journal of Clinical Microbiology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 19, 1995
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Bordetella bronchiseptica is a primary etiologic agent of swine atrophic rhinitis and bronchopneumonia in piglets. Moderate and severe outbreaks are of considerable economic importance as they are often accompanied by reduced growth rate and inefficient feed conversion. Methods currently used for the identification of B. bronchiseptica from clinical samples are time-consuming and are based, in part, on subjective observations. Here we describe the use of a nucleic acid probe for fast and easy identification of B. bronchiseptica. Unlike many such assays, the use of a radioactive label is not required. The assay is more rapid than current methods, requires only minimal training to accomplish successfully, and provides results that are easy to interpret.

Technical Abstract: Current methods for isolation and identification of Bordetella bronchisepti from clinical samples are time-consuming and are based, in part, on subjective observations. Here we describe the utilization of a Bordetella- specific DNA probe in a nonradioactive colony lift-hybridization assay for the identification of B. bronchiseptica. Eleven of 82 clinical specimens were found to contain B. bronchiseptica by this method while only 5 were reported as containing the organism when analyzed by traditional methods. The chromosomal fragment containing sequence complementary to the probe appeared to be conserved in B. bronchiseptica swine isolates from a variety of sources. The assay is more rapid than culture and biochemical testing since it can be performed directly on primary culture plates, even when heavily contaminated by other bacterial species. It requires only minimal training to accomplish successfully, and the results are easy to interpret. .

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
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