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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Increased Uterine Capacity by Injections of Recombinant Porcine Somatotropin (Rpst) to Gilts During Gestation

Authors
item Sterle, J - UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI
item Cantley, T - UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI
item Matteri, Robert
item Lucy, M - UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI
item Lamberson, W - UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI

Submitted to: Journal of Animal Science Supplement
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: July 26, 1996
Publication Date: N/A

Technical Abstract: Fetal loss in swine may result from the number of embryos exceeding the capacity of the uterus to provide nutrients. The objective of the study was to investigate the effects of rpST on growth and survival of fetuses under crowded conditions. Fifteen crossbred gilts underwent unilateral hysterectomy-ovariectomy (UHO) at 155 +/- 3 d of age. Gilts were artificially inseminated and randomly assigned to one of three regimens of daily injections: E) 5 mg (rpST) d 0-30 of gestation, 1 mL saline d 31-64 of gestation (N=5 gilts, n=27 fetuses); L) 1 mL saline d 0-29 of gestation, 5 mg rpST d 30-64 of gestation (N-5 gilts, n=33 fetuses); or C) 1 mL saline d 0-64 of gestation (N=5 gilts, n=25 fetuses). Gilts were hysterectomized on d 65 of gestation and uterine, placental and fetal measurements recorded. ------Treatment Means +/- Standard Errors------ C E L P= Uterine wt. (kg) 4.91 +/- .51 5.33 +/- .51 8.30 +/- .51 .001 Corpora Lutea 11.2 +/- .9 10.0 +/- .9 11.8 +/- .9 .35 Ovarian wt. (g) 16.8 +/- 1.8 16.7 +/- 1.8 19.7 +/- 1.8 .42 Fetal wt. (kg) .157 +/- .010 .154 +/- .010 .182 +/- .009 .10 Fetal heart wt. (g) 1.06 +/- .08 1.09 +/- .07 1.31 +/- .06 .05 Fetal kidney wt. (g) 1.65 +/- .15 1.69 +/- .14 2.12 +/- .12 .05 Viable fetuses 5.0 +/- .6 5.2 +/- .6 6.6 +/- .6 .12 Dead fetuses 3.0 +/- .37 2.8 +/- .37 1.6 +/- .37 .04 Live/total fetuses .62 +/- .04 .65 +/0 .04 .81 +/- .04 .02 These results suggest that rpST treatment from d 30-64 of gestation may increase fetal weight and survival under crowded uterine conditions.

Last Modified: 9/23/2014
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