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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: A SURVEY OF SALMONELLA IN FEEDLOT CATTLE

Authors
item Cray, Paula
item Dargatz, D - USDA-APHIS-VS-CEAH
item Thomas, L - USDA-FSIS-NVSL
item Gray, J - USDA-ARS-NADC

Submitted to: Journal of Food Protection
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 17, 1997
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Infection of cattle with Salmonella species results in millions of dollars in lost income to the cattle industry. Additionally, cattle are known carriers of Salmonella which may result in foodborne disease if consumers eat contaminated beef products. In order to accurately assess the problem, it is important to determine the prevalence of Salmonella within the cattle epopulation. A national study of health and management of cattle in feedlots was conducted. Within this study, the prevalence of Salmonella species (spp.) in fecal samples was determined. Fifty fecal samples were collected from 100 feedlots. Within each feedlot, 25 fresh fecal samples were collected from the floor of the pens of cattle which had been on feed for varying periods of time. Salmonella spp. were recovered from 38% (38/100) of the feedlots. Salmonella spp. were recovered from 5.5% of all samples. The most common serotype recovered was S. anatum (27.9%), followed by S. montevideo (12.9%), S. muenster (11.8%), S. kentucky (8.2%) and S. newington (4.3%). Shedding of the most common serotypes associated with human illness occurred infrequently (13/273; 4.8%). This study provides information on the status of Salmonella spp. from cattle in feedlots and may serve as baseline information for future studies.

Technical Abstract: A national study of health and management of cattle in feedlots was conducted. Within this study, the prevalence of Salmonella species (spp.) in fecal samples was determined. Fifty fecal samples were collected from each of 100 feedlots. Within each feedlot, 25 fresh fecal samples were collected from the floor of the pens of cattle which had been on feed the shortest and 25 from those on feed the longest periods of time. The total number of samples collected was 4,977; 2,484 and 2,495 from pens of cattle on feed the shortest and longest times, respectively. Salmonella spp. were recovered from 38% (38/100) of the feedlots. Salmonella spp. were recovered from 5.5% (273/4,977) of all samples and from 3.5% (88/2,484) and 7.4% (185/2,495) of samples from pens of cattle shortest and longest on feed, respectively. The most common serotype recovered was S. anatum (27.9%), followed by S. montevideo (12.9%), S. muenster (11.8%), S. kentucky (8.2%), and S. newington (4.3%). The most common serogroups identified were E1 (39.6%), C1 (20.7%), and B (10.4%). Shedding of the serotypes most commonly associated with human illness occurred infrequently (13/273; 4.8%). This study provides information on the status of Salmonella spp. from cattle in feedlots and may serve as baseline information for future studies.

Last Modified: 10/31/2014
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