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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Baseline Sediment Yield from Dissimilar Headwaters Research Watersheds.

Authors
item Slaughter, Charles
item Cooley, Keith
item Hanson, Clayton
item Pierson, Frederick
item Hartzmann, Ronald
item Huber, A
item Awang, J. -

Submitted to: Watershed Management Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: March 10, 1996
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Research watersheds are used in study of hydrologic processes and for establishment of baseline characteristics for hydrologic and ecosystem variables. Sediment yield reflects geologic, geomorphic, climatic, soil, plant cover, stream channel and land use influences within a watershed, and may vary markedly in response to differences in any or all of these factors. This is illustrated by two upland research watersheds that receive similar total annual precipitation, each dominated by seasonal snowfall, but with very different hydrologic and sediment yield regimes. Patterns of sediment yield and streamflow have been determined for upland semi-arid rangeland watersheds in southwestern Idaho (Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed) and for upland boreal forest watersheds in central Alaska affected by discontinuous permafrost (Caribou-Poker Creeks Research Watershed). The research programs of these contrasting headwaters research sites were independently established, but have similar aims and approaches and are contributing to knowledge of hydrologic and sediment processes in their respective biogeographic settings.

Technical Abstract: Research watersheds are used in study of hydrologic processes and for establishment of baseline characteristics for hydrologic and ecosystem variables. Sediment yield reflects geologic, geomorphic, climatic, soil, plant cover, stream channel and land use influences within a watershed, and may vary markedly in response to differences in any or all of these factors. This is illustrated by two upland research watersheds that receive similar total annual precipitation, each dominated by seasonal snowfall, but with very different hydrologic and sediment yield regimes. Patterns of sediment yield and streamflow have been determined for upland semi-arid rangeland watersheds in southwestern Idaho (Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed) and for upland boreal forest watersheds in central Alaska affected by discontinuous permafrost (Caribou-Poker Creeks Research Watershed). The research programs of these contrasting headwaters research sites were independently established, but have similar aims and approaches and are contributing to knowledge of hydrologic and sediment processes in their respective biogeographic settings.

Last Modified: 11/28/2014
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