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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Implications of Weedy Species in Management and Restoration of Pinyon and Juniper Woodlands

Author
item Svejcar, Anthony

Submitted to: Ecology and Management of Pinyon Juniper Communities Within The Interior W
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 12, 1998
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Western juniper has expanded into millions of acres of rangeland during the past 100 years. In many cases the expansion of juniper has resulted in decreased forage production and biodiversity, and increased soil erosion. There are currently many juniper control projects aimed at restoring sites that have been invaded by juniper. Weed invasion after juniper control is a major concern. Past research has shown that some types of weed invasio are short-term and do not keep a site from recovering to the condition that existed prior to juniper invasion. However, results are site specific and there are a series of steps that managers can use to help guide decisions about juniper control and subsequent weed management.

Technical Abstract: Western juniper has expanded into millions of acres of rangeland during the past 100 years. In many cases the expansion of juniper has resulted in decreased forage production and biodiversity, and increased soil erosion. There are currently many juniper control projects aimed at restoring sites that have been invaded by juniper. Weed invasion after juniper control is a major concern. Past research has shown that some types of weed invasion are short-term and do not keep a site from recovering to the condition that existed prior to juniper invasion. However, results are site specific and there are a series of steps that managers can use to help guide decisions about juniper control and subsequent weed management.

Last Modified: 10/22/2014
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