Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Marker Compounds in Sugar Industry Samples Indicating Sugar Loss

Authors
item Eggleston, Gillian
item Bland, John
item Clarke, Margaret - SUGAR PROCESSING RES INST
item Pepperman Jr, Armand

Submitted to: Sugar Processing Research Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: July 20, 1998
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Millions of dollars are lost each year in the sugar industry, because of sugar losses. Such losses are difficult to measure, and the most accurate determination of sugar losses would be to analyze for a stable sugar degradation product, that is a marker compound. Mannose can be used as marker compounds for invert losses, when alkaline conditions prevail in the industrial sugar streams. Potential oligosaccharide (short chain sugars) degradation product markers, formed across various sugar industry unit processes are reported. Improved ion chromatography technologies for separation and fractionation of sugar loss markers are discussed, as well as the use of electrospray mass spectrometry to aid the identification of markers. This research will benefit the sugar processing industry.

Technical Abstract: The most accurate determination of sugar losses in sugar manufacture and refining would be to analyze for a stable sugar degradation product, that is a marker compound. Under alkaline conditions, glucose, fructose, mannose and, to a much lesser extent, psicose are in initial equilibrium via a reversible isomerization reaction. Detection of mannose in samples taken from industrial processes where alkaline conditions prevail, confirmed that alkaline degradation of glucose and fructose (invert) had occurred. Mannose can be used as marker compounds for invert losses. Oligosaccharides are formed in the breakdown of sucrose under acid and alkaline conditions, and have strong potential as possible stable markers. Potential oligosaccharide degradation product markers, formed across various sugar industry unit processes are reported and discussed, and compared to degradation products in model study solutions. The model study sucrose degradation reactions were undertaken under simulated industrial conditions (65 deg Brix; constant pH 5.45-9.25; N2; 100 deg C). Improved ion chromatography technologies for separation and fractionation of sugar loss markers are discussed, as well as the use of electrospray mass spectrometry to aid the identification of markers.

Last Modified: 9/21/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page