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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Porcine Acute Phase Responses of Different Genotypes Before and after Transport

Authors
item Eicher, Susan
item Busse, C - PURDUE UNIVERSITY
item Shea-Moore, Margaret

Submitted to: Research Workers in Animal Diseases Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: November 12, 2000
Publication Date: November 12, 2000
Citation: EICHER, S.D., BUSSE, C., SHEA-MOORE, M. PORCINE ACUTE PHASE RESPONSES OF DIFFERENT GENOTYPES BEFORE AND AFTER TRANSPORT. RESEARCH WORKERS IN ANIMAL DISEASES CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS. 2000. P. 110.

Technical Abstract: Swine producers have genetically selected for high lean gain pigs to satisfy consumer demands for a leaner pork product. However, other traits have inadvertently been selected in that process. The lean gain pigs display greater anxiety and nervous behaviors and increased baseline cortisol. We tested the immunological responses of these pigs to a transportation stressor. Twenty four early weaned pigs, 12 selected for high-lean gain and 12 selected for low-lean gain were transported for 2 hours. Jugular blood samples were collected at -5d and 1 h post- transport, pigs were killed and blood and tissue samples taken. Hypothalamus mRNA was tested by quantitative RT-PCR for IL-1 and IL-1 receptor antagonist (Ra) expression, using the GADPH housekeeping gene. Blood samples were used to determine leukocyte differential counts, hematocrit, and to quantify plasma acute phase proteins, fibrinogen, haptoglobin, and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP). Data were analyzed as a randomized complete block design. Hematocrit values were higher for the high-lean genotype before transport (P<0.05), but within normal ranges. IL-1Ra was decreased (P<0.01) after transport in the high-lean genotype, but IL-1 mRNA was not different. Plasma AGP was less (P<0.01) for the lean gain pigs prior to transportation, but was not different between genotypes after transport. A more than two-fold increase in AGP was observed in all pigs after transport. The differential counts, fibrinogen, and haptoglobin were not different. In conclusion, selection for high-lean gain has resulted in alterations of pigs' immune responses prior to stress and following a transportation stressor. These changes could result in greater disease susceptibility.

Last Modified: 12/19/2014
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