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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Assessing 'bing' Sweet Cherry Tolerance to a Heated Controlled Atmosphere for Insect Pest Control

Authors
item SHELLIE, KRISTA
item NEVEN, LISA
item Drake, Stephen

Submitted to: HortTechnology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 15, 2001
Publication Date: April 20, 2001
Citation: SHELLIE, K., NEVEN, L.G., DRAKE, S.R. ASSESSING 'BING' SWEET CHERRY TOLERANCE TO A HEATED CONTROLLED ATMOSPHERE FOR INSECT PEST CONTROL. 2001. HORT TECHNOLOGY. 11(2):308-311.

Interpretive Summary: Japan and some U.S. domestic destinations have phytosanitary restrictions against codling moth (Cydia pomonella Lw.) and western cherry fruit fly (Rhagoletis cingulata Lw.), requiring cherries to be treated prior to shipment to ensure all fruit are free of viable insects. Fumigation with methyl bromide had been the treatment of choice, in spite of deleterious effects on cherry fruit market quality, until 1992, when it was identified as a Class I ozone-depleting substance. In this research, 'Bing' sweet cherries were exposed to two high temperature controlled atmosphere treatments or methyl bromide fumigation. Quality of fumigated or heat- treated fruit was compared to non-heated, control fruit. Research results suggested that controlled atmosphere temperature treatments have potential as a commercial quarantine treatment against codling moth and cherry fruit fly. Further investigation of the effect of cherry heating rate and the sequence of application of heating and atmosphere modification on fruit quality and insect mortality is needed. Hydrocooling prior to or after heat treatment may enhance cherry stem color.

Technical Abstract: Cherries exposed to 113 or 117 deg F in an atmosphere of 1 kPa oxygen with 15 kPa carbon dioxide (balance nitrogen) heated to a maximum center temperature of 112 or 115 deg F (44 or 46 deg C) in 41 or 27 min respectively. Heated cherries had similar incidence of pitting and decay, and similar preference ratings after 14 d of storage at 34 deg F (1 deg C) as non-heated or methyl bromide fumigated fruit. Heated cherries and methyl bromide fumigated cherries were less firm after 14 d of cold storage than non-heated, control fruit. The stems of methyl bromide fumigated cherries were less green than heated or non-heated cherries. Cherries exposed to 113 deg F had lower titratable acidity than non-heated cherries, fumigated cherries, or cherries exposed to 117 deg F. Cherry quality after 14 d of cold storage was not affected by hydrocooling prior to heating (5 min in water at 34 deg F) or the method of cooling after heating (hydrocooling, forced air cooling, or static air cooling). Cherries stored for 14 d at 34 deg F in 6 kPa (6%) oxygen with 17 kPa (17%) carbon dioxide (balance nitrogen) had similar market quality as cherries stored in air at 34 deg F. Results suggest that heating in an oxygen depleted (1 kPa), carbon dioxide enriched (15 kPa) atmosphere is a promising alternative to methyl bromide fumigation for quarantine security of 'Bing' sweet cherry.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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