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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The Role of Cooperative Research at the Logan Bee Labatory

Author
item Kemp, William

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: November 30, 2000
Publication Date: November 30, 2000
Citation: Kemp, W.P. 2000. The role of cooperative research at the logan bee labatory. Meeting Abstract.

Interpretive Summary: Research in the Federal government has changed dramatically in the past 10 years or so. The People, through a variety of legislative directives including the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993, have made it clear that government programs, including research agencies like the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) must be "outcome driven", and proceed through a logical series of steps to the solution to whatever problem is being addressed. Alfalfa seed producers and industries which serve those producers are interested in opportunities to collaborate with the ARS on problems facing the industry, particularly on pollinator and pollination management issues. In this invited manuscript, I provide examples of agreements and collaborative research that we - the USDA-ARS Bee Biology & Systematics Laboratory - have established since 1997, how these agreements have permitted more rapid technology transfer, and how the overall process has helped us to develop and maintain a relevant and "outcome driven" Federal research program.

Technical Abstract: The USDA, Agriculture Research Service (ARS), Bee Biology & Systematics Laboratory (BBSL) uses several administrative vehicles to establish collaborative research with non-governmental entities, including the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), and the Patent process. CRADA's differ from other research contracts and agreements, for example the MOU, mainly by providin the cooperator with the first right to exclusive licenses on patented inventions made under the agreement. In this presentation, I provide examples of agreements and collaborative research that we have established since 1997, how these agreements have permitted more rapid technology transfer, and how the overall process has helped us to develop and maintain a relevant and "outcome driven" Federal research program.

Last Modified: 8/21/2014
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