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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Curing Peanuts Using Continuous Flow Dryers

Authors
item BUTTS, CHRISTOPHER
item SANDERS, TIMOTHY

Submitted to: American Society of Agricultural Engineers Meetings Papers
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: July 29, 2001
Publication Date: July 29, 2001

Interpretive Summary: A two-year study was conducted to determine the potential for curing peanuts using continuous flow dryers with minimal detrimental effects on quality. A single-pass continuous flow dryer and a recirculating batch dryer were compared with conventional wagon drying systems. Peanuts cured using the continuous flow dryers were dried at a much faster rate than conventionally cured peanuts. Peanuts cured using the single-pass continuous flow dryer had unacceptably high levels of split and bald kernels when compared to those cured in wagons. The recirculating batch dryer resulted in significantly higher percent split kernels and skin slippage than the conventional dryer. However, the reduction in peanut milling quality may be acceptable in order to achieve the faster drying rate.

Technical Abstract: A two-year study was conducted in Georgia and California to determine the potential for curing peanuts using continuous flow dryers with minimal detrimental effects on quality. A single-pass continuous flow dryer and a recirculating batch dryer were compared with conventional wagon drying systems. Peanuts cured using the continuous flow dryers were dried at a much faster rate than conventionally-cured peanuts. Depending on depth and initial moisture content, the drying capacity of the the single-pass continuous flow dryer was 1.5 to 5.8 t/h. Drying capacity of the conventional dryer ranged from 0.2 to 0.4 t/h. Peanuts cured using the single-pass continuous flow dryer had 7.8 % splits compared to 4.1% when cured in conventional wagon dryers. The recirculating batch dryer resulted in significantly higher percent split kernels (10.7 %) and skin slippage (1.6%) than the conventional dryer (7.6 and 0.1%, respectively). Drying capacity for the recirculating batch dryer was approximately double that of the conventional dryer. However, the reduction in peanut milling quality may be acceptable in order to achieve the faster drying rate.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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