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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Registration of W4909 and W4910 Bread Wheat Germplasm Lines with High Salinity Tolerance

Authors
item Wang, Richard
item Larson, Steven
item Horton, William
item Chatterton, N

Submitted to: Crop Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 30, 2002
Publication Date: March 31, 2003
Citation: Wang, R., Larson, S.R., Horton, W.H., Chatterton, N.J. 2003. Registration of w4909 and w4910 bread wheat germplasm lines with high salinity tolerance. Crop Science 43:746

Interpretive Summary: Although variation in salt tolerance was observed among bread and durum wheat varieties, none of these cultivated crops were as tolerant as some wild annual and perennial Triticeae species. The most salt tolerant are species belonging to the genus Thinopyrum. Some of these species have been crossed to wheat and studies on derived addition or substitution lines showed that salt tolerance in these perennial grasses is controlled by multiple genes on several chromosomes. Therefore, transfer of salt tolerance by introducing alien genes into wheat is more complicated than transfer of pest resistance that is usually controlled by a single gene. Partial amphidiploids and disomic addition lines have been synthesized from the cross Triticum aestivum X Th.junceum by French scientists. One disomic addition line had been identified to have usable salt tolerance. It was crossed with a wheat line having the Ph1 gene from Aegilops speltoides that suppresses the action of the Ph gene. Through genetic recombinations this salt tolerance has been transferred into three wheat translocation lines, two of which are more salt tolerant than their parents. These two recombinant lines have been jointly released by USDA-ARS and Utah Agricultural Experiment Station. They are now being registered with the Crop Science Society of America so that wheat researchers around the world can use these valuable germplasm for improving salt tolerance in wheat.

Technical Abstract: Although variation in salt tolerance was observed among bread and durum wheat varieties, none of these cultivated crops were as tolerant as some wild annual and perennial Triticeae species. The most salt tolerant are species belonging to the genus Thinopyrum. Some of these species have been crossed to wheat and studies on derived addition or substitution lines showed that salt tolerance in these perennial grasses is controlled by multiple genes on several chromosomes. Therefore, transfer of salt tolerance by introducing alien genes into wheat is more complicated than transfer of pest resistance that is usually controlled by a single gene. Partial amphidiploids and disomic addition lines have been synthesized from the cross Triticum aestivum X Th.junceum by French scientists. One disomic addition line had been identified to have usable salt tolerance. It was crossed with a wheat line having the Phl gene from Aegilops speltoides that suppresses the action of the Ph gene. Through genetic recombinations this salt tolerance has been transferred into three wheat translocation lines, two of which are more salt tolerant than their parents. These two recombinant lines have been jointly released by USDA-ARS and Utah Agricultural Experiment Station. They are now being registered with the Crop Science Society of America so that wheat researchers around the world can use these valuable germplasm for improving salt tolerance in wheat.

Last Modified: 4/23/2014
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