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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Stress-Induced Metabolic Differences Between Populations and Subspecies of Artemisia Tridentata (Sagebrush) from a Single Hillside

Authors
item Smith, Bruce - BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIV
item Monaco, Thomas
item Jones, Clayton - BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIV
item Holmes, Robert - BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIV
item Hansen, Lee - BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIV
item Mcarthur, E - USDA FOREST SERVICE
item Freeman, D - WAYNE STATE UNIV

Submitted to: Thermochimica Acta
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 9, 2002
Publication Date: October 19, 2002

Interpretive Summary: Big sagebrush or Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. vaseyana grows at slightly higher, cooler, and drier sites than does A. tridentata ssp. tridentata. The two sagebrush subspecies and natural hybrids between them are found along an elevational gradient in Salt Creek Canyon, near Nephi, UT, USA, where the parent populations are separated by 85 m in elevation and 1.1 km along the transect. In 1993, three gardens were established with seedlings from five populations from different elevations planted in each garden. Physiological measurements of carbon isotope ratios, chlorophyll fluorescence, and respiratory heat and CO2 production show adaptation to the site of origin. When transplanted to foreign sites, stress was noted. Sagebrush has persistent leaves that are metabolically active all year. Seasonal changes in temperature promote metabolic responses in sagebrush that differ with population and garden.

Technical Abstract: Big sagebrush or Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. vaseyana grows at slightly higher, cooler, and drier sites than does A. tridentata ssp. tridentata. The two sagebrush subspecies and natural hybrids between them are found along an elevational gradient in Salt Creek Canyon, near Nephi, UT, USA, where the parent population are separated by 85 m in elevation and 1.1 km along the transect. In 1993, three gardens were established with seedlings from five populations from different elevations planted in each garden. Physiological measurements of carbon isotope ratios, chlorophyll fluorescence, and respiratory heat and CO2 production show adaptation to the site of origin. When transplanted to foreign sites, stress was noted. Sagebrush has persistent leaves that are metabolically active all year. Seasonal changes in temperature promote metabolic responses in sagebrush that differ with population and garden.

Last Modified: 10/24/2014
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