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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: DEVELOPMENT OF NATIVE PLANT MATERIALS IN MONGOLIA

Authors
item Winslow, Susan - USDA-NRCS
item Majerus, Mark - USDA-NRCS
item Holzworth, Larry - USDA-NRCS
item Johnson, Douglas
item Jigjidsuren, Sodnomdarjaa - ULAANBAATAR MONGOLIA

Submitted to: Society for Range Management Meeting Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: August 29, 2003
Publication Date: January 23, 2004
Citation: Winslow, S.R., Majerus, M.E., Holzworth, L.K., Johnson, D.A., Jigjidsuren, S. 2004. Development of native plant materials in Mongolia. Society for Range Management Meeting Abstracts.

Interpretive Summary: In 1994, the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service and Agricultural Research Service began a cooperative partnership to provide technical assistance to the Research Institute of Animal Husbandry in the collection and evaluation of native plant species to support long-term agricultural sustainability in Mongolia. Three forage germplasm collection expeditions in 1994, 1996, and 1998 generated 1,374 seed samples from a wide diversity of grass, legume, and shrub species. In 2000, the USDA Food for Progress (PL-480) Program provided funding to test plant material adaptation and performance at three test locations in Mongolia (semi-desert, steppe, and forest-steppe regions). The initial evaluation plantings were established under dryland and irrigated conditions and included more than 3,500 plots of direct-seeded or field-transplanted material. Extreme drought in 2001 had a detrimental effect at the Buyant semi-desert site, Turgen steppe site, and Batsumber forest-steppe site. Results from evaluations conducted in 2002 and 2003 indicated that the best performing species were Bromus inermis, Elymus dahuricus, Elymus gmelini, Elymus sibiricus, Stipa krylovii, Astragalus adsurgens, and Medicago falcata. If funding can be obtained, the final phase of the project will focus on the production of seed of the most promising accessions and the subsequent development of a forage seed industry in Mongolia. This would allow Mongolians to become self-sufficient in meeting their country's needs for plant materials that will produce forage and also conserve natural resources.

Technical Abstract: In 1994, the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service and Agricultural Research Service began a cooperative partnership to provide technical assistance to the Research Institute of Animal Husbandry in the collection and evaluation of native plant species to support long-term agricultural sustainability in Mongolia. Three forage germplasm collection expeditions in 1994, 1996, and 1998 generated 1,374 seed samples from a wide diversity of grass, legume, and shrub species. In 2000, the USDA Food for Progress (PL-480) Program provided funding to test plant material adaptation and performance at three test locations in Mongolia (semi-desert, steppe, and forest-steppe regions). The initial evaluation plantings were established under dryland and irrigated conditions and included more than 3,500 plots of direct-seeded or field-transplanted material. Extreme drought in 2001 had a detrimental effect at the Buyant semi-desert site, Turgen steppe site, and Batsumber forest-steppe site. Results from evaluations conducted in 2002 and 2003 indicated that the best performing species were Bromus inermis, Elymus dahuricus, Elymus gmelini, Elymus sibiricus, Stipa krylovii, Astragalus adsurgens, and Medicago falcata. If funding can be obtained, the final phase of the project will focus on the production of seed of the most promising accessions and the subsequent development of a forage seed industry in Mongolia. This would allow Mongolians to become self-sufficient in meeting their country's needs for plant materials that will produce forage and also conserve natural resources.

Last Modified: 10/31/2014
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