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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Caps Markers Specific to Eb, Ee and R Genomes in the Tribe Triticeae

Authors
item Li, X - INST. BOTANY, CAS
item Lee, B - JEONJU UNIV., KOREA
item Mammadov, A - INST. BOTANY, NASAR
item Koo, B - NICS, RDA, KOREA
item Mott, Ivan
item Wang, Richard

Submitted to: Genome
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 19, 2007
Publication Date: May 30, 2007
Citation: Li, X.M., Lee, B.S., Mammadov, A.C., Koo, B.C., Mott, I.W., Wang, R. 2007. Caps markers specific to eb, ee and r genomes in the tribe triticeae. Genome 50:400-411.

Interpretive Summary: Perennial grasses related to wheat, barley and rye serve as important gene pools for forage and cereal crops. Knowledge of their genome compositions is pivotal for efficient utilization of this vast gene pool in germplasm enhancement programs. Despite the large amount of genome research on Triticeae species, many of the approximate 350 species have not had their genome compositions confirmed. Based on known DNA sequences of molecular markers specific to some genomes in these grasses, PCR-based molecular markers were developed for easy determination of the presence of a genome in species of interest. Markers specific to J, E and R genomes were sequenced and then used to assess genome relationships among them. The utility of these newly developed molecular markers was demonstrated using species and cytogenetic stocks.

Technical Abstract: Wild Triticeae grasses serve as important gene pools for forage and cereal crops. Knowledge of their genome compositions is pivotal for efficient utilization of this vast gene pool in germplasm enhancement programs. Several cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) markers were developed to distinguish the Eb, Ee and R genomes. With the aid of disomic addition lines of wheat, all seven chromosomes of Eb-, Ee- and R-genome were confirmed to carry these genome-specific CAPS markers. Thus, the identified CAPS markers are useful to detect and monitor the chromosomes of these 3 genomes. This study also provides evidence suggesting that some Purdue and Chinese germplasm lines developed for barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) resistance are different from those developed in Australia. Furthermore, Thinopyrum intermedium and Th. ponticum were shown to have different genome constitutions. Sequence analyses of the ca. 1272bp sequences, containing Ty3/gypsy retrotransposons, from the Eb, Ee and R genomes also shed light on the genome evolution of these 3 genomes.

Last Modified: 4/20/2014
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