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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Difficulties of field methodology associated with an experiential learning project

Authors
item Chester, Deirdra
item Harris, Ellen

Submitted to: Ecology of Food and Nutrition
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 15, 2007
Publication Date: May 17, 2007
Citation: Chester, D.N., Harris, E.W. 2007. Difficulties of field methodology associated with an experiential learning project. Ecology of Food and Nutrition. 46:91-99.

Interpretive Summary: This study was done to test how long it took to administer the questionnaires for a multi-site community based intervention. Five Historically Black Colleges and University (HBCUs) community sites were used and included; elementary schools, middle schools, day care centers, community centers and church settings. A total of 74 African American children and 31 parents completed the questionnaires. The study findings showed that the average time for completing the questionnaires was 25 – 116 minutes for the modified USDA Diet and Health Knowledge Survey questionnaire, 4 – 33 minutes for the physical activity data sheet, and 2.2 – 18 minutes for the sociodemographic data sheet. The average time for completing the Block Brief 2000 and Block Kids Food Frequency Questionnaires was 25 minutes. A major strength of the study is that it provided hands-on learning in community nutrition research to students at the HBCUs. The study was also important in testing the effectiveness of using computers to collect community level data in different settings.

Technical Abstract: Objective: To test the mean time administration of questionnaires to be used in a multi-site community based intervention. Setting: Five Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) community sites were used, including elementary schools, middle schools, day care centers, community centers and church settings. Respondents: Seventy-four African American children and 31 parents living in these communities. Analysis: Descriptive and summary statistics for socio-demographics, BMI data, and mean time administration for instruments completed. Results: The mean time administration for the modified USDA Diet and Health Knowledge Survey questionnaire (mDHKS) was 25 – 116 minutes, 4 – 33 minutes for the physical activity data sheet, and 2.2 – 18 minutes for the socio-demographic data sheet. Mean time administration for the Block Brief 2000 and Block Kids FFQ was 25 minutes. Conclusions and Implications: A major strength of this study is that it provided experiential learning in community nutrition research to students at HBCUs. The pilot study design also lends itself to testing the effectiveness of utilizing computer technology to collect community level data in a variety of settings.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014
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