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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Breakfast in America, 2001-2002

Authors
item Kuczynski, Kevin
item Cleveland, Linda
item Goldman, Joseph
item Moshfegh, Alanna

Submitted to: Worldwide Web Site: Food Surveys Research Group
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: March 7, 2007
Publication Date: March 29, 2007
Repository URL: http://www.ars.usda.gov/SP2UserFiles/Place/12355000/pdf/Breakfast_2001_2002.pdf
Citation: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. 2007. Breakfast in America, 2001-2002. Available: http://www.ars.usda.gov/SP2UserFiles/Place/12355000/pdf/Breakfast_2001_2002.pdf

Interpretive Summary: Research has shown that breakfast has important benefits in terms of improved concentration and increased productivity. Consuming breakfast helps to maintain a healthy body weight in both children and adults. This set of fact sheets presents data on the demographic characteristics of American breakfast eaters, examines nutrient contributions of breakfast to the average U.S. diet, and identifies top reported breakfast foods and beverages. Nationally representative data were analyzed from individuals 2 years of age and older (n=9,033) from the 2001-02 What We Eat in America, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. One 24-hour dietary recall for each individual was the basis of analysis. Only 80% of Americans ate breakfast on any given day, and percentages were much lower for some groups, notably teens and young adults. On average, breakfast provided 16% of the day's total energy intake. Breakfasts provided proportionately more of most vitamins and minerals than energy, ranging from 17-30% of mean daily intakes of kilocalories. Examples include fiber (17%), calcium (23%), vitamin C (24%), vitamin A (28%), and folate (30%), which are nutrients of concern in U.S. diets. Americans ate about 1/5th of their grain products and 1/4th of their fruits and dairy products at breakfast. The top reported breakfast items include milk (46%), coffee (33%), ready-to-eat-cereals (28%), and breads/rolls (27%). Most breakfasts (75%) were consumed at home. Choices that were made more often when eating away from the home are eggs, fried potatoes, breakfast sandwiches, bacon and sausage, and soda. The data will be used by professionals and consumers to understand the contribution of breakfast to U.S. diets.

Technical Abstract: The purpose of this study was to identify the demographic characteristics of American breakfast eaters, examine nutrient contributions of breakfast to the average U.S. diet, and identify top reported breakfast foods and beverages. Data were from individuals 2 years of age and older (n=9,033) from the 2001-02 What We Eat in America, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. One 24-hour recall for each individual was the basis of analysis. Findings showed that 80% of Americans consumed breakfast on any given day. Seventy-one percent of non-Hispanic blacks ate breakfast on any given day, the lowest of all race/ethnicity groups. Only 67% of young adults 20-29 years of age ate breakfast, the lowest of all age groups. On average, breakfast provided 16% of the day's total energy intake (kcals). Breakfasts provided proportionately more of most vitamins and minerals than kcals, ranging from 17-30% of mean daily intakes. Examples include fiber (17%), calcium (23%), vitamin C (24%), vitamin A (28%), and folate (30%), which are nutrients of concern in U.S. diets. Americans ate about 1/5th of their grain products and 1/4th of their fruits and dairy products at breakfast. The top reported breakfast items include milk (46%), coffee (33%), ready-to-eat-cereals (28%), and breads/rolls (27%). Most breakfasts (75%) were consumed at home. Choices that were made more often when eating away from home are eggs, fried potatoes, breakfast sandwiches, bacon and sausage, and soda. Breakfast is an important meal that markedly contributes to the overall quality of American diets.

Last Modified: 10/24/2014
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