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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The Intragenic Approach as a New Extension to Traditional Plant Breeding

Authors
item Rommens, Caius - J.R. SIMPLOT CO., BOISE,
item Haring, Michel - UNIN. OF AMSTERDAM, NETHE
item Swords, Kathy - J.R. SIMPLOT CO, BOISE, I
item Davies, Howard - SCOTTISH CROP RESEARCH, S
item Belknap, William

Submitted to: Trends in Plant Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 1, 2007
Publication Date: September 30, 2007
Citation: Rommens, C.M., Haring, M.A., Swords, K., Davies, H.V., Belknap, W.R. 2007. The Intragenic Approach as a New Extension to Traditional Plant Breeding. Trends in Plant Science. 12:397-403.

Interpretive Summary: This paper describes recent technological advances in the methodology employed to generate genetically modified crops. Two methods are described, intragenic and cisgenic, in which the target crop is modified without introduction of any foreign DNA (all-native DNA constructs). How these methods address both consumer and regulatory issues associated with transgenic food crops is described. The use of these methods will broaden consumer choice in the type of genetically modified food crops beyond those currently available in the marketplace.

Technical Abstract: Public perception of transgenic foods has been a key factor in limiting marketplace availability of genetically modified crops. Commercialization to date has been restricted largely to seed crops modified for reduced grower input costs and enhanced yields. As these traits do not directly benefit consumers beyond commodity prices, many in the public have focused on perceived negative aspects of transgenic plants modified using “foreign” DNA. Recently, novel and more consumer-friendly “intragenic” and “cisgenic” approaches to plant transformation have become available. These methods employ the plant’s own genetic elements to enhance crop yield and, more importantly, improve food quality. Their applications will broaden consumer choice in the type of genetically modified food crops beyond those currently available in the marketplace.

Last Modified: 4/24/2014