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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Production and Characterization of ZFP36L1 Antiserum Against Recombinant Protein From Escherichia coli

Authors
item Cao, Heping
item Lin, Rui - NIH-NIEHS, NC
item Ghosh, Sanjukta - NIH-NIEHS, NC
item Anderson, Richard
item Urban, Joseph

Submitted to: Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: December 22, 2007
Publication Date: April 1, 2008
Citation: Cao, H., Lin, R., Ghosh, S., Anderson, R.A., Urban Jr, J.F. 2008. Production and Characterization of ZFP36L1 Antiserum Against Recombinant Protein From Escherichia coli. [abstract]. Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. 22:1003.7.

Technical Abstract: Tristetraprolin (TTP/ZFP36) family proteins have anti-inflammatory effects by destabilizing pro-inflammatory mRNAs. TTP expression is induced by insulin and cinnamon polyphenol extracts (CPE) in adipocytes, by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in macrophages, and by green tea polyphenol extract in rat muscle and liver. This study compared the effects of CPE, insulin, and LPS on the expression of genes encoding TTP, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and glucose transporter (GLUT) families in RAW264.7 cells. CPE increased TTP mRNA and protein levels to a lesser extent than LPS. CPE (100 µg/ml, 4 h) increased TTP, TNF, COX2, and IL6 mRNA levels up to 2, 6, 3, and 3- fold, respectively. LPS (0.1 µg/ml, 4 h) increased TTP, TNF, GM-CSF, COX2, and IL6 mRNA levels by 39, 48, 1256, 532, and 1868- fold, respectively. CPE and LPS increased the expression of GLUT1 (the major GLUT form in macrophages) by three and two-fold, respectively. Insulin (100 nM, 0.5-4 h) did not exhibit significant effects on the expression of these genes. CPE increased TTP gene expression more rapidly than the pro-inflammatory cytokines measured, and the net increase in TTP mRNA was larger than those pro-inflammatory cytokines. These results suggest that CPE may affect immune responses by regulating anti- and pro-inflammatory gene expression and energy metabolism in macrophages.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
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