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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: EPIDEMIOLOGY, ECOLOGY, AND MOLECULAR GENETICS OF ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE IN PATHOGENIC AND COMMENSAL BACTERIA FROM FOOD ANIMALS

Location: Bacterial Epidemiology and Antimicrobial Resistance

Title: Salmonella

Authors
item Bailey, Joseph
item Richardson, Larry
item Cox, Nelson
item Cosby, Douglas

Submitted to: Pathogens and Toxins in Foods: Challenges and Interventions
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: July 18, 2008
Publication Date: January 2, 2010
Citation: Bailey, J.S., Richardson, L.J., Cox Jr, N.A., Cosby, D.E. 2010. Salmonella. Pathogens and Toxins in Foods: Challenges and Interventions. Chapter 7:108-118.

Interpretive Summary: The genera Salmonella is an important human pathogen. In this book chapter, information is provided on: characteristics of the organism and types of illness; sources and incidence in the environment and foods; intrinsic and extrinsic factors affecting growth and survival; food operations that affect numbers and spread; interventions; and discriminative detection methods. In addition, current issues and research studies are discussed. This will provide audiences with valuable information on current trends of research as well as general information on Salmonella.

Technical Abstract: The problem of Salmonella in the global food chain and its current and projected repercussions on human health is cause for concern. Numerous studies have suggested that antimicrobial resistance among bacteria is on the rise and this has lead to changes in control and treatment strategies. Increased understanding of Salmonella at the molecular level will possibly lead to better intervention strategies, real time screening methods, and a dramatic reduction of Salmonella in certain food products. However, with the increase in globalization, efforts to control Salmonella will continue to be a significant issue well into the future as new products are continually introduced into the food arena. The objective of this book chapter was to compile current information on Salmonella. The topics discussed in this chapter include: characteristics of the organism and types of illness; sources and incidence in the environment and foods; intrinsic and extrinsic factors affecting growth and survival; food operations that affect numbers and spread; interventions; and discriminative detection methods. Historically, Salmonella has been thought of as a problem associated almost exclusively with meat and poultry products. Advances in methods to genetically characterize Salmonella have greatly assisted epidemiologist in their ability to accurately determine the source and spread of Salmonella. Recent epidemiological studies have clearly demonstrated that if it were ever true that meat and poultry were the primary sources of outbreaks that may no longer be the case. Outbreaks associated with tomatoes, cantaloupes, peanut butter, and other produce suggest that vigilance and interventions from the farm all the way through food processing must be maintained at all times in order to assure the production of safe and wholesome foods without Salmonella.

Last Modified: 8/1/2014
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