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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IPM TECHNOLOGIES FOR SUBTROPICAL INSECT PESTS Title: Incidence of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) and its parasitoid Tamarixia radiata (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) in Florida citrus

Authors
item Qureshi, J - UNIV OF FLORIDA
item Rogers, M - UNIV OF FLORIDA
item Hall, David
item Stansly, P - UNIV OF FLORIDA

Submitted to: Florida Entomological Society Annual Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: June 23, 2008
Publication Date: July 13, 2008
Citation: Qureshi, J.A., Rogers, M.E., Hall, D.G., Stansly, P. 2008. Incidence of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) and its parasitoid Tamarixia radiata (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) in Florida citrus [abstract], The 91st Annual Meeting of the Florida Entomological Society, July 15, 2008, Jupiter, Florida, p. 17.

Technical Abstract: Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, vectors the bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, one of the causal organisms of the devastating citrus disease “huanglongbing” or citrus greening. In the United States, D. citri was first discovered in Florida, in 1998. Tamarixia radiata Waterston, was imported from Asia and released in Florida in 1999-2001 to improve biological control of D. citri before citrus greening was detected in Florida in 2005. Florida citrus groves were surveyed during 2006-2007 for D. citri and T. radiata. Results showed that D. citri was established in all 28 citrus groves surveyed across 16 counties. Adult populations averaged 3.52, 1.27, and 1.66 individuals per “tap” sample at locations in the central, southwest, and eastern coastal regions, respectively. Citrus shoots infested with psyllid eggs or nymphs averaged 67, 44, and 45% in the central, southwest, and eastern coastal regions, respectively. T. radiata was recovered from fourth and fifth instar psyllid nymphs at 26 of the 28 locations. However, apparent parasitism rates were variable and averaged less than 20% during spring and summer over all locations. Incidence of parasitism increased during fall at some locations, averaging 39% in September and 56% in November in the central and southwest regions, respectively. These parasitism rates were lower than reported in other countries, where planned or accidental introductions of the parasitoid and significant suppression of the psyllid have been reported. Therefore, further efforts are warranted to enhance the biological control of D. citri and thereby reduce psyllid populations and spread of citrus greening.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014
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