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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: USING FUNCTIONAL AND APPLIED GENOMICS TO IMPROVE STRESS AND DISEASE RESISTANCE IN FRUIT TREES Title: Ice Nucleation, Propagation, and Deep Supercooling: The Lost Tribes of Freezing Studies

Authors
item Wisniewski, Michael
item Gusta, Lawrence - UNIV OF SASKATCHEWAN, CN
item Fuller, Michael - UNIV OF PLYMOUTH, UK
item Karlson, D. - WV UNIV, MORGANTOWN, WV

Submitted to: Plant Cold Hardiness: From the Laboratory to the Field
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: September 30, 2008
Publication Date: July 1, 2009
Citation: Wisniewski, M.E., Gusta, L.V., Fuller, M.P., Karlson, D. 2009. Ice Nucleation, Propagation, and Deep Supercooling: The Lost Tribes of Freezing Studies. pp 1-11. Plant Cold Hardiness: From the Laboratory to the Field.. eds. Gusta, L., Wisniewski, M., and Tanino, K. CABI, Oxfordshire, UK 317pp.

Technical Abstract: The past twenty years has seen an explosion of research in trying to identify genes involved in cold acclimation. Hundreds of genes are affected by exposure to low temperature but studies have mainly focused on genes that provide cryoprotection or tolerance to dehydrative stress. Some of the genes identified, however, may also be involved in other aspects of adaption to low temperature. As Gusta et al. (this volume) have indicated, the freezing process, as well as a plant response to the presence of ice within its tissues, is complex and quite diverse. Factors such as ice nucleation activity, antifreeze proteins, anti-nucleators, and plant structure should be considered to develop a holistic understanding of cold hardiness within any given species. Ice nucleation, ice propagation, and deep supercooling are integral aspects of plant adaptation to freezing temperatures. A deeper understanding of the genetic regulation and inheritance of these traits will lead to new strategies and technologies for improving plant cold hardiness.

Last Modified: 12/19/2014
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