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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVED PLANT GENETIC RESOURCES FOR PASTURES AND RANGELANDS IN THE TEMPERATE SEMIARID REGIONS OF THE WESTERN U.S. Title: Potential of Kochia prostrata and perennial grasses for rangeland restoration in Jordan

Authors
item Bailey, Derek -
item Tabini, Raed -
item Waldron, Blair
item Libbin, James -
item Al-Khalidi, Khalid -
item Alqadi, Ahmad -
item Al Oun, Mohammad -
item Jensen, Kevin

Submitted to: Rangeland Ecology and Management
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 6, 2010
Publication Date: November 5, 2010
Citation: Bailey, D.W., Tabini, R., Waldron, B.L., Libbin, J.D., Al-Khalidi, K., Alqadi, A., Al Oun, M., Jensen, K.B. 2010. Potential of Kochia prostrata and perennial grasses for rangeland restoration in Jordan. Rangeland Ecology and Management. 63:707-711.

Interpretive Summary: Six varieties of forage kochia [Kochia prostrata (L.) Shad.], three native shrubs, two introduced Atriplex shrub species native to cold deserts in the western United States and drought-tolerant perennial grass varieties were seeded and evaluated under arid rangeland conditions in Jordan. Varieties were seeded in December 2007, evaluated in August 2008, at two sites in arid rangeland areas of southern and northern Jordan. Precipitation was below normal with the southern site (Qurain) receiving 110 mm and the northern site (Tal Rimah) receiving 58 mm. Plants were more abundant and taller (P<0.001) at wetter Qurain site than the drier Tal Rimah site. Only a few native and Atriplex shrubs emerged (<3 of each species). Frequency measurements of forage kochia demonstrated that plants emerged and survived the summer in about half of each row. Abundance of KZ-6X, Octavny select and Sahro varieties of forage kochia were greater (P<0.05) than the BC-118, Immigrant and Pustiny varieties. Height was similar (P>0.10) among forage kochia varieties. Abundance and height of perennial grass varieties were similar (P>0.10) when evaluated across both sites. However, the higher frequencies of Kazak Siberian wheatgrass (21 plus or minus 3%) and Hycrest crested wheatgrass (20 plus or minus 4%) at the drier Tal Rimah site suggested that these varieties might be superior to Valivov Siberian wheatgrass (4 plus or minus 3%) and Bozoiksky Russian wildrye (6 plus or minus 4%) in very arid conditions. Based on this study, forage kochia appears to have great potential for establishing palatable perennial shrubs through direct seeding in arid rangeland conditions of Jordan, and except in extremely dry conditions arid-adapted perennial grass varieties may also be useful for direct seeding in rangeland restoration efforts.

Technical Abstract: Six varieties of forage kochia [Kochia prostrata (L.) Shad.], three native shrubs, two introduced Atriplex shrub species native to cold deserts in the western United States and drought-tolerant perennial grass varieties were seeded and evaluated under arid rangeland conditions in Jordan. Varieties were seeded in December 2007, evaluated in August 2008, at two sites in arid rangeland areas of southern and northern Jordan. Precipitation was below normal with the southern site (Qurain) receiving 110 mm and the northern site (Tal Rimah) receiving 58 mm. Plants were more abundant and taller (P<0.001) at wetter Qurain site than the drier Tal Rimah site. Only a few native and Atriplex shrubs emerged (<3 of each species). Frequency measurements of forage kochia demonstrated that plants emerged and survived the summer in about half of each row. Abundance of KZ-6X, Octavny select and Sahro varieties of forage kochia were greater (P<0.05) than the BC-118, Immigrant and Pustiny varieties. Height was similar (P>0.10) among forage kochia varieties. Abundance and height of perennial grass varieties were similar (P>0.10) when evaluated across both sites. However, the higher frequencies of Kazak Siberian wheatgrass (21 plus or minus 3%) and Hycrest crested wheatgrass (20 plus or minus 4%) at the drier Tal Rimah site suggested that these varieties might be superior to Valivov Siberian wheatgrass (4 plus or minus 3%) and Bozoiksky Russian wildrye (6 plus or minus 4%) in very arid conditions. Based on this study, forage kochia appears to have great potential for establishing palatable perennial shrubs through direct seeding in arid rangeland conditions of Jordan, and except in extremely dry conditions arid-adapted perennial grass varieties may also be useful for direct seeding in rangeland restoration efforts.

Last Modified: 10/30/2014
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