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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The effect of PIT tagging on survival, tag retention, and weight gain in fingerling white bass

Authors
item Fuller, Adam
item McEntire, Matthew

Submitted to: Journal of Applied Aquaculture
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 20, 2012
Publication Date: May 31, 2013
Citation: Fuller, S.A., McEntire, M.E. 2013. The effect of PIT tagging on survival, tag retention, and weight gain in fingerling white bass. Journal of Applied Aquaculture. 25:95-101.

Interpretive Summary: Small white bass fingerlings in six size classes were tagged with an electronic tag within their abdomen or inside the muscle on their back and evaluated to see if there were any differences in weight gain, survival, or electronic tag loss for 28 days. There was no difference in weight gain in fish tagged at either body location. For the smallest fish, tagging at either body location increased the chance of dying when compared to fish that were not tagged. Fish tagged in the abdomen had lower electronic tag loss than fish tagged in their muscle in the smallest size categories tested. Our results demonstrated that it is possible to tag white bass fingerlings larger than 14 grams without impacting survival, tag loss, or weight gain. This will allow us to identify what family each small fish comes from and use them in a genetic improvement program to improve growth in the hybrid striped bass industry.

Technical Abstract: We tagged fingerling white bass Morone chrysops with Passive Integrated Transponders (PIT) at two body locations (peritoneal cavity and dorsal musculature) and six weight classes (-6, 10, 14, 19, 25, and 30 g) to evaluate survival, tag retention, and weight gain during a 28-day experimental period. Tagging 6 g fingerlings in the dorsal musculature (DM), 6 g fingerlings in the peritoneal cavity (PC), and 14 g fingerlings DM significantly reduced survival. The probability of survival (as calculated by logistic regression) was > 95% for fingerlings > or = 19 g for both PC and DM. Retention of PIT tags varied between PC and DM tagged white bass in 6 g and14 g fingerlings. The probability of tag retention was 100% in all sizes of fingerlings tagged PC, and >95% for fish > or = 19 g tagged DM. Weight gain was not significantly affected by tagging at either location when compared to control fingerlings. These results demonstrated that it is possible to PIT tag white bass fingerlings larger than 14 g without negatively impacting survival or weight gain, and fingerlings tagged in the peritoneal cavity had higher tag retention in the smallest size categories.

Last Modified: 12/22/2014
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