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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: PHYSIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS THAT DETERMINE CROP RESPONSE TO IRRIGATION, DISEASE AND PRODUCTION PRACTICES Title: Effects of spring post-planting flooding on early soybean production systems in Mississippi

Authors
item Zhang, Lingxiao
item Kyei-Boahen, Steve -

Submitted to: Crop Management
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 29, 2011
Publication Date: July 22, 2011
Repository URL: http://Crop Management dol:10.1094/CM-2011-0722-01RS
Citation: Zhang, L., Kyei-Boahen, S. 2011. Effects of spring post-planting flooding on early soybean production systems in Mississippi. Crop Management. DOI: 10.1094/CM-2011-0722-01RS.

Interpretive Summary: April-planting of early-maturing soybean to avoid late-summer drought and to allow early harvest has become a common management practice in Mississippi. However, most of the early-planted soybeans on Sharkey clay soils in Mississippi are often exposed to waterlogged conditions during the early spring. Field experiments were conducted at the Delta Research and Extension Center (MSU) at Stoneville Mississippi in 2003 and 2004. Experiments were conducted to assess the effects of early season rainfall induced flooding on soybean seedling emergence, stand establishment and associated yield losses. Results indicated that irrigation flooding prior to seedling emergence reduced number of plants and plant height, whereas only plant stand was affected when flooding was applied at the first node stage. Flooding did not influence final seed yield in both years; however, the number of pods per plant and number of seeds per pod were higher for the non-flooded control at the first node stage. The data suggest that waterlogged conditions lasting two to three days may not have significant effect on seed yield and also indicate that potential yield lose resulting from flood is likely due to the production of fewer pods.

Technical Abstract: April planting of early-maturing soybean to avoid late-summer drought and to allow early harvest has become a common management practice in Mississippi. However, most of the early-planted soybeans on Sharkey clay soils in Mississippi are often exposed to waterlogged conditions during the early spring. Field experiments were conducted at the Delta Research and Extension Center, Mississippi State University at Stoneville Mississippi in 2003 and 2004. Experiments were conducted using a complete randomized block (CRB) design with a split-plot arrangement to assess the effects of early season rainfall induced flooding on soybean seedling emergence, stand establishment and associated yield losses. Three early soybean varieties, DK3964, AG4403 and DK4964, were used in the study. In 2003, post-planting flood treatments of 0- (control), 24-, or 48- hours were applied before seedling emergence or at first node stage (V1). In 2004, similar treatments were applied except the timings of treatment were 0-, 36, and 72 hours. Results indicated that irrigation flooding (to simulate rainfall induced flooding) prior to seedling emergence reduced number of plants and plant height, whereas only plant stand was affected when flooding was applied at the V1 stage. Flooding did not influence final seed yield in both years; however, the number of pods per plant and number of seeds per pod were higher for the non-flooded control compared with the 48 h to 72 h flood duration at the V1 stage. The data suggest that for the soybean varieties used in the study, waterlogged conditions lasting two to three days may not have significant effect on seed yield and also indicate that potential yield losses resulting from flood is likely due to the production of fewer pods.

Last Modified: 10/21/2014
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