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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVE NUTRITION FOR HONEY BEE COLONIES TO STIMULATE POPULATION GROWTH, INCREASE QUEEN QUALITY, AND REDUCE THE IMPACT OF VARROA MITES

Location: Honey Bee Research

Title: Standard methods for tracheal mite research.

Authors
item Sammataro, Diana
item De Guzman, Lilia
item George, Sherly -
item Ochoa, Ronald

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: June 21, 2013
Publication Date: September 1, 2013
Citation: Sammataro, D., De Guzman, L.I., George, S., Ochoa, R. 2013. Standard methods for tracheal mite research. In: Dietemann, V., Ellis, J., Neumann, P., editors. The COLOSS BeeBook: Volume II: Standard methods for Apis mellifera pest and pathogen research. Journal of Apicultural Research, Vol. 52(4). DOI: 10.3896/IBRA.1.52.4.20

Interpretive Summary: This chapter, for the COLOSS Beebook from the Bee Research Center in Switzerland, summarizes all the current information about the tracheal mite (Acarapis woodi) infesting honey bees (Apis mellifera). The chapter covers the effects on bees, its life history, and its range, as well as the identification of the three Acarapis species. The chapter also includes extensive information on bee sampling methods to detect this endoparasite. It summarizes how and when to collect bees for dissection and the different techniques used. These methods include microscopic detection, the thoracic disk technique, and some serological methods, including ELISA and the newer molecular methods. The final topic covers how to control Acarapis, discussing the currently-used methods to restrict mite populations. The tracheal mite can re-appear in apiaries that are not using regular treatments for the Varroa mites.

Technical Abstract: This chapter, for the COLOSS Beebook from the Bee Research Center in Switzerland, summarizes all the current information about the tracheal mite (Acarapis woodi) infesting honey bees (Apis mellifera). The chapter covers the effects on bees, its life history, and its range, as well as the identification of the three Acarapis species. The chapter also includes extensive information on bee sampling methods to detect this endoparasite. It summarizes how and when to collect bees for dissection and the different techniques used. These methods include microscopic detection, the thoracic disk technique, and some serological methods, including ELISA and the newer molecular methods. The final topic covers how to control Acarapis, discussing the currently-used methods to restrict mite populations. The tracheal mite can re-appear in apiaries that are not using regular treatments for the Varroa mites.

Last Modified: 9/2/2014
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