Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Dietary Guidelines Adherence and Healthy Body Weight Maintenance Title: Efficacy of family-based weight control program for pre-school children in primary care

Authors
item Quattrin, Teresa -
item ROEMMICH, JAMES
item Paluch, Rocco -
item Yu, Jihnhee -
item Epstein, Leonard -
item Ecker, Michelle -

Submitted to: Pediatrics
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 11, 2012
Publication Date: September 17, 2012
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/58103
Citation: Quattrin, T., Roemmich, J.N., Paluch, R., Yu, J., Epstein, L.H., Ecker, M.A. 2012. Efficacy of family-based weight control program for pre-school children in primary care. Pediatrics. doi: 10.1542/peds.2012-0701.

Interpretive Summary: This study tested the efficacy of an innovative family-based weight control intervention for overweight pre-school children and overweight parents. The treatment was conducted in the primary care setting. A total of 96 children with a BMI >85th percentile and an overweight parent were randomized to Intervention or Information Control (IC) groups. Trained staff delivered dietary and physical activity education to all parents over a 6 month period. The treatment consisted of 10 group meetings and 8 calls. Parents in the Intervention group also received education on parenting skills and behavioral modification. An intention to treat analysis was performed to test alterations in child % over BMI (%OBMI) and parent weight and to explore potential moderators of group differences in treatment response. Baseline characteristics did not differ between groups. Children in the Intervention group had greater %OBMI decreases at 3 and 6 months compared to those assigned to IC (p<0.0021). A greater BMI reduction over time was observed in parents in the Intervention group (p < 0.0001). Child %OBMI and parent BMI changes were correlated (r=0.31; p=0.003). Children with greater baseline %OBMI were more likely to have a greater %OBMI decrease over time (p =0.02).In conclusion, concurrently targeting pre-school youth and their overweight parent for behavioral weight control in a primary care setting reduced child %OBMI and parent BMI, with parent weight loss predicting child weight change.

Technical Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To test the efficacy of an innovative family-based intervention for overweight pre-school children and overweight parents conducted in the primary care setting. METHODS: 96 children with BMI >85th percentile and an overweight parent were randomized to Intervention or Information Control (IC). Trained staff delivered dietary and physical activity education to all parents over 6 months (10 group meetings and 8 calls). Parents in Intervention also received behavioral modification. An intention to treat analysis was performed using Mixed ANOVA models to test alterations in child % over BMI (%OBMI) and parent weight and to explore potential moderators of group differences in treatment response. RESULTS: Baseline characteristics did not differ between groups. Children in the Intervention group had greater %OBMI decreases at 3 and 6 months compared to those assigned to IC (p<0.0021). A greater BMI reduction over time was observed in parents in the Intervention group (p < 0.0001). Child %OBMI and parent BMI changes were correlated (r=0.31; p=0.003). Children with greater baseline %OBMI were more likely to have a greater %OBMI decrease over time (p =0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Concurrently targeting pre-school youth and their overweight parent for behavioral weight control in a primary care setting reduced child %OBMI and parent BMI, with parent weight loss predicting child weight change.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page