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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Dietary Guidelines Adherence and Healthy Body Weight Maintenance Title: Neighbourhood for playing: using GPS, GIS, and accelerometry to delineate areas within which youth are physically active

Authors
item Yin, Li -
item Raja, Samina -
item Li, Xiao -
item Lai, Yuan -
item Epstein, Leonard -
item Roemmich, James

Submitted to: Urban Studies
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 22, 2013
Publication Date: May 16, 2013
Citation: Yin, L., Raja, S., Li, X., Lai, Y., Epstein, L., Roemmich, J.N. 2013. Neighbourhood for playing: using GPS, GIS, and accelerometry to delineate areas within which youth are physically active. Urban Studies. doi:10.1177/0042098013482510.

Interpretive Summary: Research suggests an association between the built environment characteristics of the neighborhood in which adolescents live and their level of physical activity. The geographic boundaries within which youth play are often arbitrarily assumed in existing research, but the geographic boundaries of neighborhoods likely vary across youth. A one-half-mile radius around adolescents’ residences is widely used as the assumed neighborhood. There are; however, limited empirical data to support this assumption. This study uses diaries and accelerometry to supplement GPS data to delineate neighborhoods within which youth play around their residences. The study found that youth, ages 10-15, tend to focus on one section of the often assumed circled neighborhood and engage playing within a quarter-mile radius around their homes.

Technical Abstract: Abstract: Existing research suggests an association between the built environment characteristics of the neighborhood in which adolescents live and their level of physical activity. The geographic boundaries within which youth play are often arbitrarily assumed in existing research, but the geographic boundaries of neighborhoods likely vary across youth. A one-half-mile radius around adolescents’ residences is widely used as the assumed neighborhood. There are, however, limited empirical data to support this assumption. This study uses diaries and accelerometry to supplement GPS data to delineate neighborhoods within which youth play around their residences. The study found that youth, ages 10-15, tend to focus on one section of the often assumed circled neighborhood and engage playing within a quarter-mile radius around their homes

Last Modified: 11/1/2014
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