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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGICALLY BASED MANAGEMENT OF CEREAL APHIDS

Location: Wheat, Peanut and Other Field Crops Research

Title: Response of Russian wheat aphid resistance in wheat and barley to four Diuraphis (Hemiptera: Aphididae) species

Authors
item Puterka, Gary
item Nicholson, Scott
item Brown, Mike -
item Hammon, Robert -

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 7, 2012
Publication Date: April 1, 2013
Citation: Puterka, G.J., Nicholson, S.J., Brown, M., Hammon, R.W. 2013. Response of Russian wheat aphid resistance in wheat and barley to four Diuraphis (Hemiptera: Aphididae) species. Journal of Economic Entomology. 106(2):1029-1035.

Interpretive Summary: Aphid species that live on grasses and are native to the United States, D. frequens (Walker), D. mexicana (McVicar Baker) and D. tritici (Gillette), were compared a close relative and invasive species, Russian wheat aphid (RWA) Diuraphis noxia Kurdjumov, on wheat and barley entries to determine the potential for the native species to damage RWA resistant wheat. Plant damage components and infestation levels were determined 21 days after infestation by these aphids. D. mexicana and D. frequens did not survive well or damage RWA-resistant wheat or barley and appear to be narrowly adapted to wild grasses. D. tritici and RWA both have a history of infesting and damaging wheat in the United States. Our results found they both impacted wheat damage and growth similarly. The new sources of resistance to invasive species RWA were also found to be resistant to native D. tritici and would effective manage tool for both species.

Technical Abstract: Diuraphis species native to the United States, D. frequens (Walker), D. mexicana (McVicar Baker) and D. tritici (Gillette), were compared to the invasive species, Russian wheat aphid (RWA) Diuraphis noxia Kurdjumov, on sixteen RWA- resistant and susceptible wheat and barley entries to determine the potential for the native species to damage wheat. D. mexicana was unable to survive on wheat by 21d of this study and effects on the plant damage variables were negligible. D. frequens was able to survive at low levels on resistant and susceptible plant entries but had a low impact on plant damage and growth. D. noxia biotype 2 (RWA2) and D. tritici have a history of being able to severely damage wheat. Both of these aphid species had severe impacts on all plant entries except RWA2-resistant wheat containing genes from Dn7, STARS 2414-11, and CI2401 and barley containing genes from STARS 9577B and 9301B. These results indicate that sources of RWA2-resistance are effective against D. tritici. The data further suggests that these two aphid species which are broadly adapted to wild grasses and wheat genotypes may share similar genetic mechanisms governing their ability utilize and damage plants.

Last Modified: 4/23/2014
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