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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGICALLY-BASED TECHNOLOGIES FOR MANAGEMENT OF CROP INSECT PESTS IN LOCAL AND AREAWIDE PROGRAMS

Location: Insect Behavior and Biocontrol Research Unit

Title: Fall Armyworm in the Southeast

Author
item Meagher, Robert

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: September 26, 2012
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Two separate experiments testing fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) migration patterns were set up in the southeastern U.S. in 2012. Previous results showed that moths from progeny of overwintering populations from south Texas were found west of the Chattahoochee-Flint-Apalachicola river basin, whereas Florida progeny moths were found east of that system. Pheromone-baited traps were placed in counties west in Alabama (Henry, Crenshaw, and Pike counties) and east in Georgia (Mitchell, Terrell, Early, Seminole, and Decatur counties). The second experiment was designed to test whether the southern foothills of the Appalachians affect migration. Traps were placed in Alabama counties west of the most southern ridges (Limestone, Madison, and Jackson counties) and east of the ridges in Georgia (Floyd and Hart counties) and in South Carolina (Anderson).

Technical Abstract: Two separate experiments testing fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) migration patterns were set up in the southeastern U.S. in 2012. Previous results showed that moths from progeny of overwintering populations from south Texas were found west of the Chattahoochee-Flint-Apalachicola river basin, whereas Florida progeny moths were found east of that system. Pheromone-baited traps were placed in counties west in Alabama (Henry, Crenshaw, and Pike counties) and east in Georgia (Mitchell, Terrell, Early, Seminole, and Decatur counties). The second experiment was designed to test whether the southern foothills of the Appalachians affect migration. Traps were placed in Alabama counties west of the most southern ridges (Limestone, Madison, and Jackson counties) and east of the ridges in Georgia (Floyd and Hart counties) and in South Carolina (Anderson).

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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