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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: COTTON DISEASE MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES FOR SUSTAINABLE COTTON PRODUCTION

Location: Insect Control and Cotton Disease Research Unit

Title: Isolation of bacteria from cotton bolls in the Texas Coastal Bend and Rio Grande Valley

Authors
item Field, Kendall -
item Schuster, Greta -
item Nelson, Shad -
item Medrano, Enrique
item Woodward, J -
item Ong, Kevin -

Submitted to: National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: December 13, 2012
Publication Date: January 27, 2013
Citation: Field, K.N., Schuster, G., Nelson, S., Medrano, E.G., Woodward, J.E., Ong, K. 2013. Isolation of bacteria from cotton bolls in the Texas Coastal Bend and Rio Grande Valley. National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference. CDROM.

Technical Abstract: Boll rots have caused a reduction in yield, lint quality, and increased contaminated seed. During 2011 and 2012 field surveys were conducted throughout the Texas Coastal Bend and Rio Grande Valley to determine incidence of cotton boll rot. A variety trial was conducted using the top five varieties (FiberMax (FM) 1740B2F, FM 840B2F, DeltaPine (DP) 1044B2RF, DP 1048B2RF, and Phytogen (PHY) 375WRF) produced in the Coastal Bend and Rio Grande Valley regions of Texas based on producer input. Cotton bolls exhibiting insect or environmental damage were collected, dissected, ground, and plated on Tryptic Soy Agar (TSA). Colonies were identified using Gas Chromatographic Fatty Acid Methyl Esters. Preliminary results indicate that Arthobacter, Bacillus, Enterobacter, Flavimonas, Pantoea, and Pseudomonas spp. are the most commonly found microorganisms throughout the observed regions in Texas. The results also show less than 1% of bolls were infected by cotton boll rot. Determining the pathogenicity of these bacterial microorganisms would improve upon the knowledge of bacteria that may be associated with boll rot. Due to implications in the study, further research is warranted.

Last Modified: 10/21/2014
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