Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IPM TECHNOLOGIES FOR INSECT PESTS OF ORCHARD CROPS

Location: Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research

Title: Sequencing and annotation of the Wolbachia endosymbiont of Diaphorina citri by the CG-HLB genome resources group reveals candidate sources of interaction with the insect host

Authors
item Surya, Saha -
item HUNTER, WAYNE
item Lindeberg, Magdalen -

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: December 18, 2012
Publication Date: December 26, 2012
Citation: Surya, S., Hunter, W.B., Lindeberg, M. 2013. Sequencing and annotation of the Wolbachia endosymbiont of Diaphorina citri by the CG-HLB genome resources group reveals candidate sources of interaction with the insect host [abstract]. Third International Research Conference on Huanglongbing-IRCHLB III, February 4-8, 2013, Orlando, Florida.

Technical Abstract: Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), the Asian citrus psyllid, is the vector of Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus, the causal agent of huanglongbing. The D. citri metagenome has been completed to gain a better understanding of the biology of this organism and the potential roles of other psyllid bacterial endosymbionts. To corroborate candidate endosymbionts previously identified by rDNA amplification, raw reads from the D. citri metagenome sequence were mapped to reference genome sequences. Wolbachia-derived reads were extracted using the complete genome sequences for four Wolbachia strains. Reads were assembled into a draft genome sequence, and the annotation assessed for the presence of features potentially involved in host interaction. Genome alignment with the complete sequences reveals membership of Wolbachia Diaphorina, wDi, in supergroup-B, further supported by phylogenetic analysis of Wolbachia genes FtsZ. Phylogenies of FtsZ and Wsp genes indicated that the Wolbachia strain in Florida D. citri falls into a sub-clade of supergroup-B, but is distinct from Wolbachia present in Chinese D. citri isolates, supporting the hypothesis that the D. citri introduced into Florida did not originate from China, but from southwestern Asia populations.

Last Modified: 8/19/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page