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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGIES FOR SUSTAINABLE SITE-SPECIFIC SOIL AND CROP MANAGEMENT

Location: Cropping Systems and Water Quality Research

Title: Long-term suspended sediment transport in the Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed and Salt River Basin, Missouri, USA

Authors
item Baffaut, Claire
item Ghidey, Fessehaie
item Sudduth, Kenneth
item Lerch, Robert
item Sadler, Edward

Submitted to: Water Resources Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 29, 2013
Publication Date: November 4, 2013
Citation: Baffaut, C., Ghidey, F., Sudduth, K.A., Lerch, R.N., Sadler, E.J. 2013. Long-term suspended sediment transport in the Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed and Salt River Basin, Missouri, USA. Water Resources Research. 49:7827-7830. DOI: 10.1002/wrcr.20511.

Interpretive Summary: Long-term sediment monitoring data are needed to determine the effects of agricultural practices, changes in agricultural practices, and climate change on sediment transport. Since 1992, efforts have been conducted in Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed to assess sediment losses from this 28 square mile northeast Missouri watershed located in the Salt River Basin, which forms the drainage of Mark Twain Lake. This effort was complemented by monitoring sediment loss from three fields within the watershed. Sediment transport was also assessed from 12 watersheds in tributaries to Mark Twain Lake. Sampling techniques, analytical methods, site locations, and equipment infrastructure are described. This paper supports the use of these data in research and as such benefits both scientists using the data, and those who in turn benefit from that research.

Technical Abstract: Since 1992, efforts have been conducted in Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed to assess sediment transport from this 72-km2 Missouri watershed located in the Salt River Basin, the Long-Term Agro-ecosystem Research site in the Central Mississippi River Basin. This effort was complemented by field-scale assessment of sediment loss. In addition, sediment transport was assessed from 12 watersheds in the Salt River Basin. Sampling techniques, analytical methods, site locations, and equipment infrastructures are described in this paper.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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