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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: GENOMICS APPROACHES FOR IMPROVING NUTRITIONAL QUALITY OF FOOD CROP SPECIES

Location: Plant, Soil and Nutrition Research

Title: Evaluation of germplasm effect on Fe, Zn and Se content in wheat seedlings

Authors
item Souza, Gulherme -
item Carvalho, Janice -
item Rutzke, Michael -
item Albrecht, Julio -
item Guilherme, Luiz -
item Li, Li

Submitted to: Plant Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 28, 2013
Publication Date: September 2, 2013
Citation: Souza, G., Carvalho, J., Rutzke, M., Albrecht, J., Guilherme, L., Li, L. 2013. Evaluation of germplasm effect on Fe, Zn and Se content in wheat seedlings. Plant Science. 210:206-213.

Interpretive Summary: Plant mineral nutrient status affects plant growth and subsequently the yield and nutrient content in edible tissues/organs. We evaluated wheat germplasm in response to iron (Fe), zinc (Zn) and selenium (Se) treatments. We found that wheat plants exhibited different growth responses to these minerals and possessed various abilities to accumulate them. While limited mineral interactions were observed between Fe or Zn with other nutrients, Se supplement alters Fe, Zn, sulfur (S), molybdenum (Mo), magneisum (Mg), calcium (Ca) and manganese (Mn) content in wheat plants. This study provides important information for the effect of these micronutrients on plant growth and mineral interaction, and for breeding wheat cultivars with better plant health and potential to accumulate essential micronutrients in edible grains.

Technical Abstract: Micronutrients are essential for human health and crucial for plant survival. The capacity of food crops in acquiring mineral nutrients affects plant growth and potentially the yield and nutrient content in edible tissues/organs. In this study, we selected 20 wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) accessions and evaluated genotypic variations of the young seedlings in response to iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), and selenium (Se) treatments. Wheat accessions exhibited different growth responses to these minerals and possessed various abilities to accumulate them. Wheat seedlings in general were less tolerable to excess of Fe and benefits from increased levels of Zn. They were sensitive to selenite and profited from selenate at low dosages. Limited mineral interactions were observed between Fe or Zn with other nutrients. In contrast, selenate supply enhanced Fe, Zn, sulfur (S), molybdenum (Mo), magnesium (Mg), calcium (Ca) and manganese (Mn) content in wheat seedlings, supporting its beneficial role in promoting plant growth; Selenite supplement reduced Zn, S, Mo, Mg, Ca and Mn levels in the plants, consisting with its detrimental role in inhibiting seedling growth. Based on nutrient accumulation, plant growth, and mineral interaction, a number of accessions such as EMB 38 and BRS 264 appear to be good lines for breeding wheat cultivars with better plant health and potential to accumulate essential micronutrients in edible grains.

Last Modified: 4/23/2014
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