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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Improving Nutrient Utilization in Western Irrigated Crop Production Systems

Location: Northwest Irrigation and Soils Research

Title: Aggregate tensile strength and friability characteristics of furrow and sprinkler irrigated fields in Southern Idaho

Authors
item Koehn, Anita
item Lehrsch, Gary
item Busscher, Warren
item Evans, Dean
item King, Bradley
item Stieneke, Daniel
item Sojka, Robert -

Submitted to: Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 7, 2014
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Agricultural crops grown in southern Idaho are furrow or sprinkler irrigated. Therefore, the soil experiences several wetting and drying cycles each growing season that can contribute to changes in aggregate tensile strength and friability. The objective of the research was to evaluate the influence of irrigation on soil structural properties. Four furrow irrigated fields were sampled at the top and bottom of the field, in the furrow and on the bed location of the furrow. Five sprinkler irrigated fields were sampled at 0-5 and 5-15 cm depth and at the top and bottom of the field. Results from this study indicate that differences in tensile strength in furrow irrigated fields were only evident soon after irrigation; otherwise, there were few differences in tensile strength and friability. In sprinkler irrigated fields tensile strength increased with depth in 3 of the 5 fields measured. Friability was less affected by depth.

Technical Abstract: Agricultural crops grown in southern Idaho are furrow or sprinkler irrigated. Therefore, the soil experiences several wetting and drying cycles each growing season that can contribute to changes in aggregate tensile strength and friability. The objective of the research was to evaluate the influence of irrigation on soil structural properties. Four furrow irrigated fields were sampled at the top and bottom of the field, in the furrow and on the bed location of the furrow. Five sprinkler irrigated fields were sampled at 0-5 and 5-15 cm depth and at the top and bottom of the field. Results from this study indicate that differences in tensile strength in furrow irrigated fields were only evident soon after irrigation; otherwise, there were few differences in tensile strength and friability. In sprinkler irrigated fields tensile strength increased with depth in 3 of the 5 fields measured.Friability was less affected by depth.

Last Modified: 9/20/2014
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