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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Improved Control of Stripe Rust in Cereal Crops

Location: Wheat Genetics, Quality Physiology and Disease Research

Title: Identification of Yr59 conferring high-temperature adult-plant resistance to stripe rust in wheat germplasm PI 178759

Authors
item Zhou, Xinli -
item Wang, Meinan -
item Chen, Xianming
item Lu, Yan -
item Kang, Zhenshen -
item Jing, Jinxue -

Submitted to: Theoretical and Applied Genetics
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 12, 2014
Publication Date: February 1, 2014
Repository URL: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00122-014-2269-z/fulltext.html
Citation: Zhou, X., Wang, M., Chen, X., Lu, Y., Kang, Z., Jing, J. 2014. Identification of Yr59 conferring high-temperature adult-plant resistance to stripe rust in wheat germplasm PI 178759. Theoretical and Applied Genetics. 127:935-945.

Interpretive Summary: Stripe rust is one of the most widespread and destructive wheat diseases worldwide. Resistant cultivars are the preferred means of control. The spring wheat germplasm PI 178759 showed effective resistance to stripe rust in field evaluations over eight years in Washington State, USA. To map the resistance genes, it was crossed with susceptible Avocet, and the parents and thye mapping population were tested for stripe rust reactions in fields near Pullman and at Mount Vernon, WA in 2010, and in a greenhouse with selected stripe rust races. Stripe rust resistance in PI 178759 was identified to be the high-temperature adult-plant (HTAP) resistance type and was quantitatively inherited. The broad-sense heritability of resistance was 76.3% for relative area under the disease progress curve (rAUDPC) calculated from disease severity and 72.7% based on infection type data. One major gene was mapped to the long arm of chromosome 7B. Flanked by markers Xwgp5175 and Xbarc32 in a 2.1 cM region, the gene explained 31.8% and 54.7% of the phenotypic variation in rAUDPC and IT, respectively. Based on genetic distances among markers and allelism tests, the HTAP resistance gene in PI 178759 is different from the previously reported Yr39, Yr52, YrZH84, and YrC591, also located on chromosome 7BL, and is therefore designated as Yr59. This new gene and its flanking markers should be useful for developing wheat cultivars with durable resistance.

Technical Abstract: Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, is one of the most widespread and destructive wheat diseases worldwide. Resistant cultivars are the preferred means of control. The spring wheat germplasm ‘PI 178759’ originating from Iraq showed effective resistance to stripe rust in field evaluations over eight years in Washington State, USA. To map the resistance gene(s), PI 178759 was crossed with ‘Avocet Susceptible’ (AvS), and the parents and 176 F2:3 lines were phenotyped in the field under natural infection near Pullman and at Mount Vernon, Washington during the 2010 growing season, and in a greenhouse with selected races of P. striiformis f. sp. tritici. Stripe rust resistance in PI 178759 was identified to be the high-temperature adult-plant (HTAP) resistance type and was quantitatively inherited. The broad-sense heritability of resistance was 76.3% for relative area under the disease progress curve (rAUDPC) calculated from disease severity and 72.7% based on infection type (IT). Resistance gene analog polymorphism (RGAP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) techniques were used to identify molecular markers linked to the resistance gene and a chromosome region was mapped using a quantitative trait locus (QTL) approach. One major gene or QTL was mapped to the long arm of chromosome 7B. Flanked by Xwgp5175 and Xbarc32 in a 2.1 cM region, the gene explained 31.8% and 54.7% of the phenotypic variation in rAUDPC and IT, respectively. Based on genetic distances among markers and allelism tests, the HTAP resistance gene in PI 178759 is different from the previously reported Yr39, Yr52, YrZH84, and YrC591, also located on chromosome 7BL, and is therefore designated as Yr59. The gene and its flanking markers should be useful for developing wheat cultivars with durable resistance.

Last Modified: 11/22/2014
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