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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: FUNCTIONAL GENOMIC APPROACHES FOR CONTROLLING DISEASES OF SWINE

Location: Animal Parasitic Diseases

Title: Opportunities for bead-based multiplex assays in veterinary diagnostic laboratories

Authors
item Christopher-Hennings, J -
item Araujo, K -
item Souza, C -
item Fang, Y -
item Lawson, S -
item Nelson, E -
item Clement, T -
item Dunn, M -
item Lunney, Joan

Submitted to: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 26, 2013
Publication Date: October 23, 2013
Citation: Christopher-Hennings, J., Araujo, K.P., Souza, C., Fang, Y., Lawson, S., Nelson, E., Clement, T., Dunn, M., Lunney, J.K. 2013. Opportunities for bead-based multiplex assays in veterinary diagnostic laboratories. Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation. 25:671-691.

Interpretive Summary: Advances in technology have resulted in new bead based multiplex assays (BBMA), also referred to as Luminexa , MultiAnalyte Profiling or cytometric bead array (CBA) assays. These are high throughput assays that enable simultaneous detection of multiple analytes in solution (from several up to 50-500 analytes within a single, small sample volume). For veterinary applications there are few assays that are commercially available; those that are available measure various immune proteins, e.g., cytokines and anti-pathogen antibodies. For humans, non-human primates and rodents numerous BBMAs are available for cytokines, growth factors and their receptors, inflammatory proteins, kinases and inhibitors, neurobiology proteins, pathogens and antibodies. There is a great potential for use of BBMAs in veterinary medicine; various pathogens could be detected using nucleotide labeled beads and protein-coupled beads could be used for the development of antigen and antibody BBMAs. These assays could then be used for detection of pathogens, genotyping, measurement of hormone expression levels as well as applications in disease surveillance and vaccine assessment. In order to use BBMAs effectively it will be important to evaluate whether BBMAs versus other assays currently in use are “fit for purpose.” Researchers will have to determine how costs and efficiencies compare between assays and what BBMAs are published or commercially available for specific veterinary applications. Finally, it will be important to document the procedures involved in the development of the most effective and comprehensive BBMAs for each diagnostic or research use. Thus we predict that many BBMAs with veterinary applications will be developed, published and/or become commercially available in the next few years. This review summarizes currently available BBMA technologies used in veterinary settings and outlines future prospects for development and application of new BBMAs.

Technical Abstract: Bead based multiplex assays (BBMA) also referred to as Luminex, MultiAnalyte Profiling or cytometric bead array (CBA) assays, are applicable for high throughput, simultaneous detection of multiple analytes in solution (from several, up to 50-500 analytes within a single, small sample volume). Currently, few assays are commercially available for veterinary applications, but they are available to identify and measure various cytokines, growth factors and their receptors, inflammatory proteins, kinases and inhibitors, neurobiology proteins, pathogens and antibodies in human, non-human primate and rodent species. In veterinary medicine, various nucleic acid and proteincoupled beads can be used in, or for the development of, antigen and antibody BBMAs. These assays could be used for many purposes, such as detection of pathogens, genotyping, measurement of hormone expression levels and applications in disease surveillance and vaccine assessment. It will be important to evaluate whether BBMAs versus other assays currently in use are “fit for purpose”, how costs and efficiencies compare between assays and what BBMAs are published or commercially available for specific veterinary applications. In addition, it will be important to document the procedures involved in the development of these assays. It is expected that many BBMAs with veterinary applications will be published and/or become commercially available in the next few years. This review summarizes currently available BBMA technologies used in veterinary settings and outlines future prospects for development and application of new BBMAs.

Last Modified: 10/22/2014
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