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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Improved Sugar Beet Germplasm and Innovative Disease Management Approaches to Increase Yield and Reduce Product Losses

Location: Northwest Irrigation and Soils Research

Title: Control of curly top in sugar beet with seed and foliar insecticides

Authors
item Strausbaugh, Carl
item Wenninger, Erik -
item Eujayl, Imad

Submitted to: Plant Disease
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 27, 2014
Publication Date: July 8, 2014
Citation: Strausbaugh, C.A., Wenninger, E.J., Eujayl, I.A. 2014. Control of curly top in sugar beet with seed and foliar insecticides. Plant Disease. 98:1075-1080.

Interpretive Summary: Curly top in the semiarid production areas of the United States is caused by one of three Curtovirus species (BCTV, BMCTV, and BSCTV) and vectored by the beet leafhopper. Resistant sugar beet cultivars became available in the 1930s prior to which curly top almost eliminated the sugar beet industry in the western United States. However, resistance is typically low to intermediate in commercial cultivars and has a tendency to be associated with lower yield potential. Thus, alternative control measures are needed to alleviate curly top losses. A number of in-furrow, foliar, and seed treatment insecticides have been investigated but the neonicotinoid seed treatment clothianidin was established as the most effective management tool to supplement host resistance. Initial studies under low to moderate natural curly top pressure indicated root yields could be increased by approximately 20% using the clothianidin seed treatment. Current studies with a resistant cultivar show seed treatments (active ingredient clothianidin) were able to reduce symptoms by 26 to 42% and increase recoverable sucrose by 15 to 17%. The pyrethroids Asana and Mustang when applied as foliar treatments just before and after release of viruliferous leafhoppers also performed well by reducing symptoms 22 to 56% and increasing yields 13 to 20%. The neonicotinoid seed treatments should be an effective way of supplementing host resistance for early season (at least 59 days after planting) curly top control in sugar beet. The pyrethroid foliar applications could be used to extend curly top control during the mid-season period and provide resistance management.

Technical Abstract: Curly top in sugar beet is a serious widespread problem that is caused by Beet curly top virus and other closely species and vectored by the beet leafhopper. In order to find a means of reducing curly top in sugar beet, 15 combinations of insecticide seed (Poncho, Poncho Beta, and Poncho Votivo) and foliar (Asana, Cyazypyr, Lorsban, Mustang, Scorpion, and Sivanto) treatments were evaluated versus an untreated check during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons. A severe epiphytotic was created by releasing viruliferous beet leafhoppers 58 to 59 days after planting. The foliar sprays were applied 6 to 7 days before and again 6 to 8 days after leafhopper release. Seed treatments (active ingredient clothianidin) were able to reduce symptoms by 26 to 42% and increase recoverable sucrose by 15 to 17%. The pyrethroids Asana and Mustang also performed well by reducing symptoms 22 to 56% and increasing yields 13 to 20%. The neonicotinoid seed treatments should be an effective way of supplementing host resistance for early season (at least 59 days after planting) curly top control in sugar beet. The pyrethroid foliar applications could be used to extend curly top control during the mid-season period and provide resistance management.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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