Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVED NUTRIENT EFFICIENCY OF BEEF CATTLE AND SWINE

Location: Nutrition and Environmental Management Research

Title: Effects of feeding dry-rolled corn-based diets with and without wet distillers grains with solubles and zilpaterol hydrochloride on performance characteristics, and heat stress in finishing beef steers

Authors
item Hales, Kristin
item Shackelford, Steven
item Wells, James
item King, David
item Hayes, Morgan
item Brown Brandl, Tami
item Kuehn, Larry
item Freetly, Harvey
item Wheeler, Tommy

Submitted to: Journal of Animal Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 1, 2014
Publication Date: September 1, 2014
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/59558
Citation: Hales, K.E., Shackelford, S.D., Wells, J., King, D.A., Hayes, M., Brown-Brandl, T.M., Kuehn, L.A., Freetly, H.C., Wheeler, T.L. 2014. Effects of feeding dry-rolled corn-based diets with and without wet distillers grains with solubles and zilpaterol hydrochloride on performance characteristics, and heat stress in finishing beef steers. Journal of Animal Science. 92(9):4023-4033.

Interpretive Summary: Beta-agonists such as zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) can be used with or without wet distillers grains and solubles (WDGS) to improve animal performance and carcass characteristics during summer months with little to no impact on cattle heat stress. Zilpaterol hydrochloride has been approved for use in feedlot cattle since 2006; however, there is no research on any interactions between ZH and co-products such as WDGS. Additionally, there is no published information on the potential effects of ZH on heat stress in feedlot cattle. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to determine the effects of feeding dry-rolled corn-based diets with and without WDGS and ZH on performance, carcass characteristics, and heat stress in finishing beef steers. Experimental diets included 0% or 30% WDGS and 0 or 84 mg/steer ZH. Final body weight, daily gain, and feed efficiency were greater for cattle fed ZH than non-ZH fed cattle. Additionally, cattle fed ZH consumed less feed than cattle not fed the additive. Daily gain and feed efficiency was greater for cattle fed 30% vs. 0% WDGS. Carcass weight, dressing percentage, ribeye area, and yield grade were greater for cattle fed ZH than those not fed ZH. Cattle fed 30% WDGS had a greater dressing percentage and tended to have more 12th rib fat. There were no differences in heat stress measurements for cattle fed 0 or 84 mg/steer of ZH or cattle fed 0 or 30% WDGS.

Technical Abstract: : Zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) has been approved for use since 2006; however, there is no research on any interactions between ZH and co-products such as wet distillers grains and solubles (WDGS). Additionally, there is no published information on the potential effects of ZH on heat stress in feedlot cattle. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to determine the effects of feeding dry-rolled corn-based diets with and without WDGS and ZH on performance, carcass characteristics, and heat stress in finishing beef steers. Four hundred thirty-eight steers were used (415.3 ± 2.1 kg BW) in a randomized complete block design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Factors consisted of inclusion of WDGS 0% or 30% on a DM-basis and inclusion of ZH at 0 or 84 mg/steer daily for 21 d at the end of the finishing period. Thus, cattle were blocked by BW and randomly assigned to 1 of the resulting 4 treatment combinations: 1) dry-rolled corn (DRC)-based diet with 0% WDGS and 84 mg/steer ZH (CON+ZH), 2) DRC-based diet with 0% WDGS and no ZH (CON-ZH), 3) DRC-based diet with 30% WDGS and 84 mg/steer of ZH (WDGS+ZH), and 4) DRC-based diet with 30% WDGS and no ZH (WDGS-ZH). Final live BW, carcass-adjusted BW, ADG, and G:F were greater for cattle fed ZH than non-ZH fed cattle (P < 0.01). Additionally, cattle fed ZH consumed 7.4% less DM than cattle not fed the additive (P < 0.01). Cattle fed ZH for 21 d also had a 2.9% greater HCW (P < 0.01), a 1.1% greater dressing percentage (P < 0.01), 7.3% greater LM area (P < 0.01), and an 8.4% improvement in yield grade (P < 0.01) than cattle not fed ZH. For the main-effect of WDGS inclusion, ADG was greater for cattle fed 0% vs. 30% WDGS (P = 0.04) and G:F also tended to be greater for cattle fed 0% vs. 30% WDGS (P = 0.07) for the 21 d ZH feeding period. However, when evaluated over the entire experiment, cattle fed 30% vs. 0% WDGS had a greater ADG and G:F (P < 0.01). Furthermore, cattle fed 30% vs. 0% WDGS had a greater dressing percentage and tended to have a greater amount of 12th rib fat (P < 0.07). The slopes for change in respiration rate and panting score per day were positive, but not different across dietary treatments (P = 0.57 and P = 0.54, respectively). Likewise, the slopes for change in respiration rate and panting score when accounting for environmental conditions were positive, but not different across dietary treatments (P = 0.46 and P = 0.32).

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page