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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: HOST PLANT RESISTANCE AND OTHER MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES FOR NEMATODES IN COTTON AND PEANUT

Location: Crop Protection and Management Research

Title: Improving suppression of Meloidogyne spp. by Purpureocillium lilacinum strain 251

Authors
item Parajuu, Gita -
item Kemerait, Robert -
item Timper, Patricia

Submitted to: Nematology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 31, 2014
Publication Date: June 4, 2014
Citation: Parajuu, G., Kemerait, R., Timper, P. 2014. Improving suppression of Meloidogyne spp. by Purpureocillium lilacinum strain 251. Nematology. 16:711-717.

Interpretive Summary: The fungus Purpureocillium lilacinum (syn. Paecilomyces lilacinus) is marketed for control of plant-parasitic nematodes in several countries. Our objectives in this study were to determine whether suppression of root-knot nematodes by strain 251 was affected by the crop plant and whether growing a winter cover crops such as rye and crimson clover would improved suppression of the southern root-knot nematode on cotton by the fungus. All experiments were conducted in a greenhouse using non-sterilized field soil. To determine the relative efficacy of strain 251 on cotton, peanut, and maize, four concentrations of strain 251 (NemOutTM) were applied in furrow: 336 g/ha, 252 g/ha, 168 g/ha, and 0 g/ha. Although the fungus reduced numbers of nematode eggs on all crops, percentage suppression was lower on maize than on cotton and peanut at all inoculum levels of the fungus. When rye and crimson clover were grown in pots for 30 days and then killed with an herbicide prior to applying strain 251 and planting cotton, the fungus failed to suppress numbers of nematode eggs when the surface residue of the cover crops was removed. However, when the residues were left on the soil surface, percentage suppression (49% for clover and 63% for rye) was greater than when the soil was left fallow (36%). The residue could have created conditions that were more conducive than bare soil to the fungus such as lower soil temperatures and increase moisture retention.

Technical Abstract: The fungus Purpureocillium lilacinum (syn. Paecilomyces lilacinus) is marketed for control of plant-parasitic nematodes in several countries. Our objectives in this study were to determine whether suppression of Meloidogyne spp. by P. lilacinum strain 251 was affected by the crop plant and whether growing a winter cover crops such as rye and crimson clover would improved suppression of M. incognita on cotton by the fungus. All experiments were conducted in a greenhouse using non-sterilized field soil. To determine the relative efficacy of P. lilacinum on cotton (Gossypium hirsutum), peanut (Arachis hypogaea) and maize (Zea mays), four concentrations of P. lilacinum (NemOutTM) were applied in furrow: 336 g/ha, 252 g/ha, 168 g/ha, and 0 g/ha. Although the fungus reduced numbers of Meloidogyne spp. eggs on all crops, percentage suppression was lower on maize than on cotton and peanut at all inoculum levels of P. lilacinum. When rye and crimson clover were grown in pots for 30 days and then killed with a herbicide prior to applying P. lilacninum and M. incognita and planting cotton, the fungus failed to suppress numbers of nematode eggs when the surface residue of the cover crops was removed. However, when the residues were left on the soil surface, percentage suppression (49% for clover and 63% for rye) was greater than when the soil was left fallow (36%). The residue could have created conditions that were more conducive than bare soil to the fungus such as lower soil temperatures and increase moisture retention.

Last Modified: 11/26/2014
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