Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Improved Control of Stripe Rust in Cereal Crops

Location: Wheat Genetics, Quality Physiology and Disease Research

Title: Mapping stripe rust resistance genes in a Brundage x Coda winter wheat recombinant inbred line population

Authors
item Case, A. -
item Naruoka, Y. -
item Chen, Xianming
item Garland-Campbell, Kimberly
item Zemetra, R. -
item Carter, A. -

Submitted to: PLoS One
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 14, 2014
Publication Date: March 18, 2014
Citation: Case, A., Naruoka, Y., Chen, X., Garland Campbell, K.A., Zemetra, R.S., Carter, A.H. 2014. Mapping stripe rust resistance genes in a Brundage x Coda winter wheat recombinant inbred line population. PLoS One. 9(3):e91758.

Interpretive Summary: A recombinant inbred line (RIL) mapping population developed from a cross between winter wheat cultivars Coda and Brundage was evaluated for reaction to stripe rust. A total of 268 RILs from the population were evaluated in replicated field trials in 9 site-year locations in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. Seedling reaction to three stripe rust races was also examined. A linkage map consisting of 2,391 polymorphic DNA markers was developed covering all wheat chromosomes except 1D. Two genes on chromosome 1B associated with adult plant and seedling reactions were the most significant. Together these two genes reduced adult plant infection type from 7 to 2 and disease severity by 25% and provided protection against the three tested races in the seedling stage. The location and specificity of these genes suggest that observed effects at these loci are due to a complementation of the previously known but defeated resistances of the cultivar Tres combining with that of Madsen (the two parent cultivars of Coda). Two additional genes on chromosome 3B and one on 5B were associated with adult plant reaction only, and a single QTL on chromosome 5D was associated with seedling reaction to one of the tested races. Coda has been resistant to stripe rust since its release in 2000, indicating that combining multiple resistance genes for stripe rust provides durable resistance. Identified molecular markers will allow for an efficient transfer of these genes into other cultivars, thereby continuing to provide excellent resistance to stripe rust.

Technical Abstract: A recombinant inbred line (RIL) mapping population developed from a cross between winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars Coda and Brundage was evaluated for reaction to stripe rust (caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici). Two hundred and sixty eight RIL from the population were evaluated in replicated field trials in a total of nine site-year locations in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. Seedling reaction to stripe rust races PST-100, PST-114 and PST-127 was also examined. A linkage map consisting of 2,391 polymorphic DNA markers was developed covering all chromosomes of wheat with the exception of 1D. Two QTL on chromosome 1B were associated with adult plant and seedling reaction and were the most significant QTL detected. Together these QTL reduced adult plant infection type from a score of seven to a score of two reduced disease severity by an average of 25% and provided protection against race PST-100, PST-114 and PST-127 in the seedling stage. The location of these QTL and the race specificity provided by them suggest that observed effects at this locus are due to a complementation of the previously known but defeated resistances of the cultivar Tres combining with that of Madsen (the two parent cultivars of Coda). Two additional QTL on chromosome 3B and one on 5B were associated with adult plant reaction only, and a single QTL on chromosome 5D was associated with seedling reaction to PST-114. Coda has been resistant to stripe rust since its release in 2000, indicating that combining multiple resistance genes for stripe rust provides durable resistance, especially when all-stage resistance genes are combined in a fashion to maximize the number of races they protect against. Identified molecular markers will allow for an efficient transfer of these genes into other cultivars, thereby continuing to provide excellent resistance to stripe rust.

Last Modified: 11/24/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page